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What Is Bmw Xdrive Review?

What Is Bmw Xdrive Review
What are the advantages of BMW xDrive? – There’s one big advantage of BMW xDrive and that’s grip. With xDrive fitted to your BMW, it has essentially 50% more grip of a two-wheel drive model by doubling the contact patches (or tyres) that put power to the road.

This is most beneficial on icy and snowy roads where a traditional rear-wheel drive BMW on standard tyres struggles to make progress. On these kinds of roads, a normal BMW will easily spin up its back tyres and get, well, no where. An xDrive BMW will sense the slip and check it, sending power to the front wheels to drag the car forwards.

While extreme weather is where you’ll feel xDrive doings its best work, it’s worth having on wet roads, too. The extra grip will make your BMW more stable under power and less susceptible to slipping if you hit standing water coming out of a corner. It’ll do its best work when accelerating, say you’re aiming for a gap on a busy roundabout – with xDrive fitted, your BMW will hurtle towards the space with the same urgency whether it’s bone dry or streaming wet.

What does xDrive do for BMW?

What Is BMW xDRIVE Technology? – BMW xDRIVE technology is an advanced, permanent all-wheel drive system that ensures your BMW has the best possible traction at all times. This helps to keep you safe in inclement weather and in imperfect driving conditions, and helps provide smooth, sporty performance.

What is the difference between BMW xDrive and normal?

What is the difference between sDrive and xDrive? – The only difference between sDrive and xDrive are the wheels powered by the engine and transmission. sDrive models are only two-wheel drive. This could refer to any BMW that is rear-wheel drive, such as the, or one that is front-wheel drive, such as the,

Is xDrive better than AWD?

BMW xDrive vs. AWD – What are BMW xDrive and sDrive? As you’ve now seen, these two systems are the Ultimate Driving Machine’s responses to traditional all-wheel drive and two-wheel drive setups, respectively. Still, since many brands make bold claims about their all-wheel drive systems, it can be helpful to compare BMW xDrive vs. AWD in depth:

Unlike traditional all-wheel drive systems, xDrive relies on a multi-disc clutch that comes mated to the drivetrain. Traditional AWD and 4WD systems provide consistent power to all four wheels. If one or two wheels lose traction, that power is simply lost! xDrive eliminates this issue. Allowing for a 100% transfer of power to either the front or rear axle, xDrive ensures that you never experience a loss of control. Competing systems may sometimes allow for a partial transfer of power, but with xDrive you get a faster and more satisfying shift.

Is BMW xDrive always on?

The xDrive system is active all the time but only steps in when it detects a potential hazard due to low grip and uneven surfaces or a sharp change in direction. The system optimizes traction, improves agility, and works to keep a vehicle safely in its lane.

Is BMW xDrive reliable?

The BMW 328i xDrive Reliability Rating is 2.5 out of 5.0, which ranks it 24th out of 31 for luxury midsize cars. The average annual repair cost is $900 which means it has poor ownership costs. Repairs are more frequent for the 328i xDrive, so you may experience a few more visits to your BMW shop than normal.

Is xDrive good in snow?

How does BMW xDrive work? – BMW xDrive works by constantly monitoring the speed of your vehicle’s wheels. If it detects wheel slip, which can happen on snowy roads, this system sends more power to the wheels with more traction to help you get moving and back on track.

Is BMW xDrive more expensive?

What are the disadvantages of BMW xDrive? – Of course, with advantages of all-wheel drive, there is also a few disadvantages too. These include:

Cost – The initial cost of xDrive is more expensive than that of a comparable rear-wheel drive model due to the extra parts. It will also use more fuel. Fun factor – The famed driver-focused rear-wheel drive BMW models are much more focused than the ‘more stable’ all-wheel drive models. Of course, this will all depend on the driver’s preference.

Is xDrive better than Quattro?

BMW xDrive® – is an electronic all-wheel drive system. xDrive® uses a multi-plate clutch system to electronically adjust torque distribution every 0.1 seconds based on current driving conditions. The biggest difference between xDrive® and quattro® is the axle balance.

  • BMW gives their cars a standard rear-balance BMW feel with 40% of torque in the front axle and 60% in the rear.
  • That distribution is automatically adjusted on the fly as the system detects wheels slipping.
  • The drawback is that this system can also adjust in normal conditions without input from the driver.

BMW X-Drive® is available on most BMW vehicles.

Is xDrive better in rain?

xDrive in the rain? THE LARGEST BMW 2-SERIES FORUM ON THE PLANET

06-16-2016, 07:08 AM #
Second Lieutenant Drives: 2016 750i xDrive Join Date: Nov 2012 Location: NC iTrader: ( ) Garage List xDrive in the rain? My next auto will be for a daily driver when I’m not riding my motorcycle to work and am considering a 2er for the job. I’d love an M2 or M3 but really not for simple commuting tasks, even a base 2er is a little overkill probably, but a guy has to have some reward after a long day at work. Living on the coast, we do get a fair amount of rain, often pretty heavy when we do. I’m thinking the xDrive would be optimal, even though I prefer manual. I saw Farrah’s experience on the wet track and was kind of surprised. But that is track and what I’m needing is feedback on the street from members who have experienced with it. How does it handle standing water, acceleration, lane changes, braking? Any comparison to RWD in the wet is also appreciated. _ 2019 X3 M40i Phytonic Blue/Oyster Past BMWs: 2016 750i xDrive 2013 335i Sedan Sport Line, 2005 645Ci Coupe 6MT, 2001 M5, 2001 540i 6MT, 2001 M Roadster

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06-16-2016, 09:16 AM # Major General Drives: ’15 228i and ’18 330i GT Join Date: Mar 2014 Location: Southwest USA Quote:

Originally Posted by speeddeacon My next auto will be for a daily driver when I’m not riding my motorcycle to work and am considering a 2er for the job. I’d love an M2 or M3 but really not for simple commuting tasks, even a base 2er is a little overkill probably, but a guy has to have some reward after a long day at work. Living on the coast, we do get a fair amount of rain, often pretty heavy when we do. I’m thinking the xDrive would be optimal, even though I prefer manual. I saw Farrah’s experience on the wet track and was kind of surprised. But that is track and what I’m needing is feedback on the street from members who have experienced with it. How does it handle standing water, acceleration, lane changes, braking? Any comparison to RWD in the wet is also appreciated.

Much of the answer will depend on your wet-weather driving style. If you still use enough throttle angle to break the tires loose, XDrive will certainly provide an advantage. However, if you modify your driving in rain to be less aggressive, then the primary factor is the tires, not how many of them are powered. Traversing standing water, braking, susceptibility to hydroplaning, turning, are most heavily dependent on the traction gained by the tire and the inflation pressure. XDrive will have zero effect on braking or coping with deeper water/hyrdoplaning. (BTW, a rough estimate of potential hydroplaning speed is the square root of the tire pressure x 10.e.g. square root of 36 psi = 6 x 10 = 60mph). Rather than sacrifice the manual trans you prefer and perhaps not spend for XDrive, consider swapping out the original tires at delivery for Continental DWS06 or Michelin Pilot Sport AS3+, among the best tested for wet roads. Yes, Tire Rack tests on a track, for comparable data, but applicable to street usage. Part of the rationale for this is the decision-making which OEs use for the tires installed at assembly. To maximize fuel economy and reduce potential CAFE penalties, OE-installed tires are typically a harder rubber compound to reduce rolling resistance. The downside of this is reduced traction, particularly on wet or snow/ice.think directionally about the hard rubber of a hockey puck versus something softer. When a tire manufacturer controls the compound for their direct sales in the aftermarket, they can emphasize performance capability or other attributes as needed (quiet, smooth, etc.) This may be the best investment to have the car you want and optimize wet weather capability, again, assuming you don’t need XDrive to cope with driving that breaks the tires loose and help by sending power to the front wheels to move forward if traction is lost at the rear. You may find someone to buy your original tires on the forum or at the dealer.perhaps someone approaching lease turn in who needs legal tread depth or has worn through their first set and values a good deal. _ 2015 VO 228i 6MT/Track Handling,Tech,Cold,Premium,Lighting,Driver Assistance Pkgs/KCDesign Strut Brace/M2 LCAs/Rogue SSK/BBS SR Wheels/Michelin PS4S/ER Chargepipe/AA Intercooler/Dinan Shockware/MPerformance Spoiler/Black Kidney Grilles/Xpel Ultimate PPF & Prime XR+ Tint/Adam’s Ceramic/no CDV 2018 Alpine White 330GT

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06-16-2016, 09:38 AM # Major General Drives: 2006 S2000 Join Date: Apr 2010 Location: Boston I drive aggressively even in snow on RWD, I never had any issue with rain it’s the same as driving on dry roads

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06-16-2016, 10:05 AM # Major General Drives: 2018 M2 AW DCT Join Date: Aug 2012 Location: Seattle, WA iTrader: ( ) Garage List I have Michelin A/S 3+ and have no problems driving my rear wheel drive 2 in the rain. And we get a fair amount of rain in Seattle.

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06-16-2016, 12:12 PM # Lieutenant Drives: 2015 M235xi BSM Join Date: Apr 2011 Location: Chicago I’ve had a tuned RWD 135i with and LSD and now a tuned xdrive M235i. No comparison in rain between the 2. Xdrive you can accelerate almost full throttle from a stop in light rain, RWD will spin tires and you will have hard time hooking up under a heavy pedal. Also around wet turns you will fishtail in RWD using much pedal vs. no real issues with AWD. As others have said stopping, and hydroplaning are no difference in either. I’ve had both in very similar powered cars and if you want to accelerate quickly in the rain, the xdrive is far superior to RWD. I’ve had both and has been my experience. Invariably this will turn into a RWD vs AWD bashing thread, but whatever, both have their place in my book. _ ’15 M235xi | BSM/Oyster/Aluminum | Black Kidneys | RW Carbon Mirror Caps | 40% tint
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06-16-2016, 12:52 PM # Major General Drives: ’15 228i and ’18 330i GT Join Date: Mar 2014 Location: Southwest USA Quote:

Originally Posted by kdog26372 Invariably this will turn into a RWD vs AWD bashing thread, but whatever, both have their place in my book.

Gosh, hope not.no reason for that to happen.it’s just physics. If, as said above, you want to be heavy in the throttle either straight or through turns, XDrive will clearly be helpful. If you back off in the rain, you may not notice nor need its benefit.O.P., find the car which suits your behavior, including the trade-off of automatic vs manual. _ 2015 VO 228i 6MT/Track Handling,Tech,Cold,Premium,Lighting,Driver Assistance Pkgs/KCDesign Strut Brace/M2 LCAs/Rogue SSK/BBS SR Wheels/Michelin PS4S/ER Chargepipe/AA Intercooler/Dinan Shockware/MPerformance Spoiler/Black Kidney Grilles/Xpel Ultimate PPF & Prime XR+ Tint/Adam’s Ceramic/no CDV 2018 Alpine White 330GT

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06-16-2016, 12:55 PM # Major General Drives: 2006 S2000 Join Date: Apr 2010 Location: Boston ^ you would have to be going way over the legal limits in rain to take advantage of that AWD in cornering. Launching car is easier on AWD even in dry and obviously in rain, but I have no issue spinning in rain with LSD. again obviously not full throttle just spirited driving. Tires are far more important for safety then RWD vs AWD

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06-16-2016, 03:59 PM # Major Drives: BMW 228ix Join Date: Apr 2016 Location: Lewes DE Quote:

Originally Posted by kdog26372 I’ve had a tuned RWD 135i with and LSD and now a tuned xdrive M235i. No comparison in rain between the 2. Xdrive you can accelerate almost full throttle from a stop in light rain, RWD will spin tires and you will have hard time hooking up under a heavy pedal. Also around wet turns you will fishtail in RWD using much pedal vs. no real issues with AWD. As others have said stopping, and hydroplaning are no difference in either. I’ve had both in very similar powered cars and if you want to accelerate quickly in the rain, the xdrive is far superior to RWD. I’ve had both and has been my experience. Invariably this will turn into a RWD vs AWD bashing thread, but whatever, both have their place in my book.

That is good news. I just picked up a 16 228ix, I also have an X3 which will be driven when it snows for better clearance if it gets heavy.

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06-16-2016, 04:34 PM # Major General Drives: 2006 S2000 Join Date: Apr 2010 Location: Boston Quote:

Originally Posted by Rayscott That is good news. I just picked up a 16 228ix, I also have an X3 which will be driven when it snows for better clearance if it gets heavy.

Hope you putting snow tires on that X3

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06-16-2016, 04:36 PM # Major General Drives: ’15 228i and ’18 330i GT Join Date: Mar 2014 Location: Southwest USA Quote:

Originally Posted by Kolyan2k Hope you putting snow tires on that X3

100 I also said that to Rayscott previously, but not sure I was persuasive? Braking/turning are the lifesavers and that’s all about tires! _ 2015 VO 228i 6MT/Track Handling,Tech,Cold,Premium,Lighting,Driver Assistance Pkgs/KCDesign Strut Brace/M2 LCAs/Rogue SSK/BBS SR Wheels/Michelin PS4S/ER Chargepipe/AA Intercooler/Dinan Shockware/MPerformance Spoiler/Black Kidney Grilles/Xpel Ultimate PPF & Prime XR+ Tint/Adam’s Ceramic/no CDV 2018 Alpine White 330GT

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06-16-2016, 06:52 PM # Lieutenant Drives: 2015 M235xi BSM Join Date: Apr 2011 Location: Chicago Quote:

Originally Posted by Kolyan2k Hope you putting snow tires on that X3

My old 2012 X3 was terrible in the snow with the stock all season tires. My old Volvo with FWD and Continental DWS all seasons was far superior. For the M235 get summers for summer and winters for winter regardless of RWD or AWD. For an X3 which isn’t a sports coupe, I’d get the Conti DWS’s and call it a day. They are really quite good in snow and at least as good or better than the stock all seasons in summer as well and putting summer tires on an SUV like the X3 is just overkill I think. _ ’15 M235xi | BSM/Oyster/Aluminum | Black Kidneys | RW Carbon Mirror Caps | 40% tint

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06-16-2016, 07:00 PM # Major General Drives: 2006 S2000 Join Date: Apr 2010 Location: Boston Quote:

Originally Posted by kdog26372 My old 2012 X3 was terrible in the snow with the stock all season tires. My old Volvo with FWD and Continental DWS all seasons was far superior. For the M235 get summers for summer and winters for winter regardless of RWD or AWD. For an X3 which isn’t a sports coupe, I’d get the Conti DWS’s and call it a day. They are really quite good in snow and at least as good or better than the stock all seasons in summer as well and putting summer tires on an SUV like the X3 is just overkill I think.

Yeah heard good things about those tires.but it really depends what you want, how safe you want to be.and how bad your winter is. I have a buddy driving RWD cars for like 20 years on AS tires with zero accidents, but there isn’t much snow in Mass and most is at night or weekends anyway I use summer/winter set up on AWD and RWD cars, after getting my 1st AWD here I understood that’s it’s just extra weight for me and I do prefer RWD characteristics even in rain and snow

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06-16-2016, 07:58 PM # Major Drives: BMW 228ix Join Date: Apr 2016 Location: Lewes DE Quote:

Originally Posted by Sportstick +100 I also said that to Rayscott previously, but not sure I was persuasive? Braking/turning are the lifesavers and that’s all about tires!

Yes you were persuasive, sorry I didn’t reply. I traded my Jeep Wrangler Rubicon with 33’s on the 228i as snow was not a problem. So now that the X3 is the snow car I will definitely look into winter tires. thanks.

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06-16-2016, 10:44 PM # Major General Drives: M340i, Tesla MYP Join Date: Mar 2010 Location: Issaquah, WA The 235i xDrive is a dope AWD car. I’ve had a lot of AWD vehicles and this one is the best. Combine the noticeable RWD bias with outstanding front to rear balance and it makes for a lovely machine. Now do you need/want AWD? That’s a personal choice but roads are wet at least 50% of the year here and being able to accelerate and corner on throttle similar to dry conditions is a big deal if you like to drive aggressively. Don’t believe anyone who says RWD with the right tires is no different in wet or dry. That’s utter BS. Now how much the RWD suffers vs AWD in wet may or may not matter to some. You have to decide what is best for you. It’s RWD or AWD, not both. Either car should have the best tires for the conditions though to maximize performance. Also, this is among the best auto box trannies to date. For a torque converter, it is fantastic and gives you the option to crawl in auto when stuck in traffic. Some people just can’t tolerate paddle shifting but as long as you drive in manual mode most of the time it’s a really rewarding transmission.

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06-17-2016, 07:35 AM # Major General Drives: 2006 S2000 Join Date: Apr 2010 Location: Boston Quote:

Originally Posted by Transfer The 235i xDrive is a dope AWD car. I’ve had a lot of AWD vehicles and this one is the best. Combine the noticeable RWD bias with outstanding front to rear balance and it makes for a lovely machine. Now do you need/want AWD? That’s a personal choice but roads are wet at least 50% of the year here and being able to accelerate and corner on throttle similar to dry conditions is a big deal if you like to drive aggressively. Don’t believe anyone who says RWD with the right tires is no different in wet or dry. That’s utter BS. Now how much the RWD suffers vs AWD in wet may or may not matter to some. You have to decide what is best for you. It’s RWD or AWD, not both. Either car should have the best tires for the conditions though to maximize performance. Also, this is among the best auto box trannies to date. For a torque converter, it is fantastic and gives you the option to crawl in auto when stuck in traffic. Some people just can’t tolerate paddle shifting but as long as you drive in manual mode most of the time it’s a really rewarding transmission.

Given the same tires in rain and snow AWD will handle better (dry most likely worse on track, not street). I mean if your priority is to drive 90mph in 25mph ramps or going full throttle from the light, then I guess you need AWD, I usually take those in rain going 50-60 with no issues. As far as different tires AS vs summers and rain I don’t know. In snow AWD on AS tires is worse then RWD with winters.it’s a fact. About ZF transmission, when Lexus released high performance 8-speed automatic in 2008 on ISF, all BMW fans and many reviews said it’s garbage and you must get either manual or DCT. It’s 2016 and Lexus tranny still shifts faster then BMW ZF even today. Just a funny observation. Last edited by Kolyan2k; 06-17-2016 at 07:58 AM,

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06-17-2016, 11:20 AM # Lieutenant Drives: 2015 M235xi BSM Join Date: Apr 2011 Location: Chicago Quote:

Originally Posted by Kolyan2k About ZF transmission, when Lexus released high performance 8-speed automatic in 2008 on ISF, all BMW fans and many reviews said it’s garbage and you must get either manual or DCT. It’s 2016 and Lexus tranny still shifts faster then BMW ZF even today. Just a funny observation.
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The new Audi S4 will ditch the DCT and go to a ZF 8 speed which seems pretty odd as the S3 even gets a DCT and is probably $15k cheaper. I’ve not had a DCT equipped tranny, but I do find the 8 speed in our cars shifts very quickly and smoothly, much better than the 6 speed auto in my old 135i. When I look at the 0-60 vs. the 5-60 times in the new M2 w/DCT they are off by,4 seconds looking at the M235i automatic the spread is,8 seconds. This is a sizable difference and I don’t know if it’s how the ECU is tuned or is fully based on the responsiveness of the DCT vs. ZF. When I look at the Audi S3 with DCT the spread is huge – 1.2 seconds; it’s 5-60 is 5.6 seconds which explains when I test drove 1 I felt it was relatively slow compared to the m235i even though on paper they test out similar. I think the Audi’s launch control is at much higher RPM’s and give inflated real world acceleration figures as hardly anyone will be using launch control driving around town even aggressively. _ ’15 M235xi | BSM/Oyster/Aluminum | Black Kidneys | RW Carbon Mirror Caps | 40% tint

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06-17-2016, 11:32 AM # Major General Drives: 2006 S2000 Join Date: Apr 2010 Location: Boston Quote:

Originally Posted by kdog26372 The new Audi S4 will ditch the DCT and go to a ZF 8 speed which seems pretty odd as the S3 even gets a DCT and is probably $15k cheaper. I’ve not had a DCT equipped tranny, but I do find the 8 speed in our cars shifts very quickly and smoothly, much better than the 6 speed auto in my old 135i. When I look at the 0-60 vs. the 5-60 times in the new M2 w/DCT they are off by,4 seconds looking at the M235i automatic the spread is,8 seconds. This is a sizable difference and I don’t know if it’s how the ECU is tuned or is fully based on the responsiveness of the DCT vs. ZF. When I look at the Audi S3 with DCT the spread is huge – 1.2 seconds; it’s 5-60 is 5.6 seconds which explains when I test drove 1 I felt it was relatively slow compared to the m235i even though on paper they test out similar. I think the Audi’s launch control is at much higher RPM’s and give inflated real world acceleration figures as hardly anyone will be using launch control driving around town even aggressively.

DCT gets reserved for M models and probably RS in Audi later. ZF is cheaper to make and good enough for most drivers from grannies to enthusiasts. Its going in many cars from Audi BMW to Dodge trucks now days. And of course its great after all its an improvement from ZF6. I think it uses the same technology as Lexus now thats why its good. Many/All M owner will still call it slushbox PS. S4 and S3 have different chassis. S3 is front wheel drive biased maybe thats why it cant get ZF8 yet, and current dual-clutch tranny is S4 cant seem to handle the torque as I’ve read Last edited by Kolyan2k; 06-17-2016 at 11:49 AM,

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06-18-2016, 02:21 PM # Second Lieutenant Drives: 2016 750i xDrive Join Date: Nov 2012 Location: NC iTrader: ( ) Garage List Thanks everyone who has replied so far. I should have been a bit more specific as only a few have answered my intended question, so I apologize. Let me make the provisio for RWD vs AWD 2 series with all else being equal (excellent a/s tires on both). I wasn’t looking for commentary on tires or driving style, but just for opinions of those who have driven in the rain in a 2 series, and even more for those who’ve driven both RWD and AWD in the rain and how they compare. I had Pilot Sport A/S on our F30 and it handled the rain well but occasionally I could feel the front end was on the edge of breaking traction. They were light years ahead of the OEM RFTs of course. My query here is really if or how much better the xDrive handles the rain than the RWD. While an M2/4 can be driven in the snow with appropriate tires, that is not my intention. This will be my cold weather/rainy day driver. Which I choose will also have something to do with availability. I will likely look for a used/off lease car so finding a RWD with MT may or may not be easy, even if I choose to go that route. _ 2019 X3 M40i Phytonic Blue/Oyster Past BMWs: 2016 750i xDrive 2013 335i Sedan Sport Line, 2005 645Ci Coupe 6MT, 2001 M5, 2001 540i 6MT, 2001 M Roadster

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06-19-2016, 01:15 PM # Lieutenant Drives: 2015 M235xi BSM Join Date: Apr 2011 Location: Chicago Quote:

Originally Posted by speeddeacon Thanks everyone who has replied so far. I should have been a bit more specific as only a few have answered my intended question, so I apologize. Let me make the provisio for RWD vs AWD 2 series with all else being equal (excellent a/s tires on both). I wasn’t looking for commentary on tires or driving style, but just for opinions of those who have driven in the rain in a 2 series, and even more for those who’ve driven both RWD and AWD in the rain and how they compare. I had Pilot Sport A/S on our F30 and it handled the rain well but occasionally I could feel the front end was on the edge of breaking traction. They were light years ahead of the OEM RFTs of course. My query here is really if or how much better the xDrive handles the rain than the RWD. While an M2/4 can be driven in the snow with appropriate tires, that is not my intention. This will be my cold weather/rainy day driver. Which I choose will also have something to do with availability. I will likely look for a used/off lease car so finding a RWD with MT may or may not be easy, even if I choose to go that route.

I think I gave real world driving impression of RWD vs AWD in our BMW 6 cylinder turbos. In a straight-line you will get very similar 0-60 with AWD whereas you will spinout and have to feather the throttle with RWD in the rain, probably a full 1/2 to second slower depending on how rainy. You will fishtail around corners in the RWD car in the rain and/or the traction control will kick in and you won’t go anywhere until it straightens out, with the xdrive you will still have to take it easy in the rain around corners, but it will right the ship much quicker and you’d be hard pressed to get into any trouble. My advice is simple wait for a rainy day and go test drive both. Just go to a dealer and try them both as aggressively or as normally as you would as if it was your own car, the rest will be others opinions or results which may not match how you drive. Also, I prefer to test drive by myself as that’s how I usually drive and I tend to take it easy when the salesman is in the car. Plus the extra 200+ pounds isn’t as fun. _ ’15 M235xi | BSM/Oyster/Aluminum | Black Kidneys | RW Carbon Mirror Caps | 40% tint

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06-19-2016, 01:39 PM # Major General Drives: 2006 S2000 Join Date: Apr 2010 Location: Boston Like I said before, I’ve had AWD and RWD cars, and I actually like driving in rain, especially heavy rain. never did I spin out or had problems with traction kicking in. I would have to through the car aggressively on purpose in order to loose traction. I did noticed less traction on cheaper tires and no LSD on my tuned 335i, but again only when driving very aggressively in order to have some fun. This is all cornering, straight line driving is zero difference at all, drove my M3 in hurricane/rain with trees falling on highway, 80mph no problem if wipers allow it. That said given proper tires AWD will always be safer in challenging weather conditions, RWD will always be more fun to drive. * My personal experience from spirited driving habits.I would usually take corners faster then everyone and far beyond the legal limits Last edited by Kolyan2k; 06-19-2016 at 02:09 PM,

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06-19-2016, 01:43 PM # Major General Drives: ’15 228i and ’18 330i GT Join Date: Mar 2014 Location: Southwest USA @speeddeacon I think you are looking for a component-level response for what is a system-level event. There is no way to pull apart the effect of the driver from the behavior of RWD vs AWD in the rain. And Kdog’s comments, which I believe to be accurate, demonstrate that point. If you drive such as he does, AWD will make its benefits clear. If you drive as I do, AWD is of no noticeable benefit. @kdog I agree with your description of the vehicle behaviors, but you and I are likely diametrical in how we deal with rain. My driving in rain produces differences in acceleration in multiples of seconds, not fractions, and I frankly don’t care. I’m fine waiting for dry days again to enjoy the car.0-60 is the last thing I think about in the rain. For your driving style, AWD clearly should make a difference. For mine in the rain, it has no beneficial effect as I don’t take wet corners at a speed where the rear could possibly slide out given the Pilot AS3 tires and tread depth. I’m not making any value judgements one way or the other on driving style, but I think it’s inescapable that how one drives determines the value of AWD in the rain. Therefore, Speeddeacon should decide accordingly. _ 2015 VO 228i 6MT/Track Handling,Tech,Cold,Premium,Lighting,Driver Assistance Pkgs/KCDesign Strut Brace/M2 LCAs/Rogue SSK/BBS SR Wheels/Michelin PS4S/ER Chargepipe/AA Intercooler/Dinan Shockware/MPerformance Spoiler/Black Kidney Grilles/Xpel Ultimate PPF & Prime XR+ Tint/Adam’s Ceramic/no CDV 2018 Alpine White 330GT

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06-19-2016, 04:12 PM # Lieutenant Drives: 2015 M235xi BSM Join Date: Apr 2011 Location: Chicago Quote:

Originally Posted by Sportstick @speeddeacon I think you are looking for a component-level response for what is a system-level event. There is no way to pull apart the effect of the driver from the behavior of RWD vs AWD in the rain. And Kdog’s comments, which I believe to be accurate, demonstrate that point. If you drive such as he does, AWD will make its benefits clear. If you drive as I do, AWD is of no noticeable benefit. @kdog I agree with your description of the vehicle behaviors, but you and I are likely diametrical in how we deal with rain. My driving in rain produces differences in acceleration in multiples of seconds, not fractions, and I frankly don’t care. I’m fine waiting for dry days again to enjoy the car.0-60 is the last thing I think about in the rain. For your driving style, AWD clearly should make a difference. For mine in the rain, it has no beneficial effect as I don’t take wet corners at a speed where the rear could possibly slide out given the Pilot AS3 tires and tread depth. I’m not making any value judgements one way or the other on driving style, but I think it’s inescapable that how one drives determines the value of AWD in the rain. Therefore, Speeddeacon should decide accordingly.
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Agree 100%, he needs to test out both in wet conditions with how he will be driving and make his own judgment, only way to know what’s the best fit for him. _ ’15 M235xi | BSM/Oyster/Aluminum | Black Kidneys | RW Carbon Mirror Caps | 40% tint

xDrive in the rain?

Which is better BMW or Audi?

Which Brand Performs Better? – As mentioned above, performance is a critical aspect of any luxury vehicle. When talking about Audi vs. BMW, we first need to compare the performance each of them offers in comparison to each other. According to leasefetcher.co.uk, the performance of each vehicle is as follows:

Audi: Audi possesses a power that the BMW does not. You can book it on the road with an Audi. BMW: BMW vehicles are generally better equipped for a more sporty performance, ready for a rugged and flat driving experience.

Of course, performance will vary based on the model you decide to invest in for yourself. If you’re looking for an Audi with a great performance, according to car.usnews.com, you should get the 2020 Audi A3. For a BMW model, they suggest the BMW 5-Series.

Which is better Audi or Mercedes or BMW?

Who Wins When You Compare an Audi, a Mercedes, and a BMW? – Therefore, now that we’ve analysed the three manufacturers, which brand should you choose? Mercedes, BMW, or Audi? Which will provide you with the most opulent driving experience that is tailored to your requirements? It’s crucial to remember that all three automakers value quality.

Does BMW xDrive need tire rotation?

How Often Should You Rotate Your Tires? – We’ve indicated above that many BMW models will require tire rotations every 5,000-7,500 miles. But that’s more for front-wheel-drive models. If your BMW has xDrive all-wheel drive, you’ll probably want to do tire rotations every 3,000-5,000 miles. Have additional questions? Contact our expert BMW service technicians,

Does xDrive need servicing?

No maintenance required. ZF8 is filled for life as is the VTG unit.

Is BMW xDrive full-time all-wheel drive?

BMW xDrive: how it works – xDrive is a full-time all-wheel drive system, rather than a part-time drivetrain; systems like VW’s Haldex differential only fires surplus torque to the opposite axle when the car’s on-board ECU senses wheelslip. So under normal conditions, BMW’s xDrive is rear-biased, sending 40% of drive to the front wheels, and 60% rearwards.

However, this can be altered in one tenth of a second, with almost 100% of engine torque being applied to the front or rear axle, depending on grip available. This is allocated by an electronically controlled multi-plate clutch, rather than hydraulic fluid. After normal driving conditions return, the system reverts back to its 40:60 split.

More recent and high-end models combine this system with BMW’s Dynamic Stability Control to help rotate the car into the turn by braking individual wheels and cutting power across the axle.

Does xDrive handle better?

What Is Bmw Xdrive Review Are you comparing BMW sDrive vs. xDrive? xDrive is BMW AWD technology designed to enhance your every drive, but sDrive isn’t your average 2WD setup. Although xDrive will improve your vehicle’s handling and acceleration, models equipped with sDrive are generally slightly more efficient.

Is xDrive good for off road?

Can the BMW X5 go off-road? – Yes, but don’t expect to scale mountains in it. Any BMW trim with ‘xDrive’ has all-wheel drive, making it better suited for off-roading. This mid-size SUV is also equipped with front-facing off-road cameras, which allow drivers to see what’s ahead as they go on a downhill descent.

Does xDrive have launch control?

It is possible to launch the car in 2nd gear by yourself without using automatic launch control in Competition models with M xDrive. The Competition models with RWD use 2nd gear for the automatic launch control start anyway.

How much does it cost to maintain an xDrive?

The estimated cost to maintain and repair a BMW 530e xDrive ranges from $95 to $1755, with an average of $274.

Is BMW 3 Series xDrive reliable?

BMW 3 Series review – Reliability and safety 2023 ​BMW has a reputation for making solidly reliable cars, and feedback from our customer satisfaction survey is improving. In 2022, The German manufacturer finished in 16th place out of 29 brands (up from 21st position in the previous year), which is positive news but still shows room for improvement.

  1. The 3 Series finished in 32nd spot out of 75 cars in the Driver Power best cars to own poll, which was the strongest performance of any BMW model.
  2. Put the seventh-generation 3 Series through a rigorous safety testing procedure in 2019 and awarded it a full five stars.
  3. Adult and child occupant protection achieved 97 per cent and 87 per cent, respectively.

Additional safety systems come under what BMW terms Active Guard Plus. This includes speed limit information,, a collision and pedestrian warning system with a city brake function, plus cruise control with braking function. For a more comprehensive suite of safety systems, buyers can add the Driving Assistant Professional package for around £2,200.

  1. This includes active cruise control, steering and lane control assistant, lane keeping assistant with active side collision protection, priority warning and wrong-way warning systems and cross-traffic alert.
  2. BMW’s Connected+ service is offered as standard, which can alert the emergency services in the event of an accident.

BMW offers a three-year unlimited mileage warranty on the 3 Series, and this also includes a three-year subscription to the BMW Emergency breakdown service. This is broadly similar to the warranty offered by Mercedes, but better than the 60,000 mile limit favoured by,

  1. The BMW warranty can be extended after the initial three-year period with either monthly or annual payments and differing levels of cover.
  2. BMW’s paintwork warranty lasts for three years, while its anti-corrosion warranty is of 12 years in duration.
  3. The 3 Series will require servicing approximately every 20,000 miles, dependent on the car’s use and mileage covered.

BMW runs its Pay Monthly Service Plan with prices for the 3 Series starting from around £26 per month.

Does xDrive handle better?

What Is Bmw Xdrive Review Are you comparing BMW sDrive vs. xDrive? xDrive is BMW AWD technology designed to enhance your every drive, but sDrive isn’t your average 2WD setup. Although xDrive will improve your vehicle’s handling and acceleration, models equipped with sDrive are generally slightly more efficient.

Is BMW xDrive faster?

VIDEO: BMW M3 Competition RWD vs BMW M3 Competition xDrive – Drag Race This is the first generation of all-wheel drive M3 and the BMW purists are still in their acclimation phase. While cars like the and M8 — which are all-wheel drive-only — did help BMW fans get used to the idea of all-wheel drive M cars, the M3 is sort of a sacred machine for the M Division-faithful.

It’s supposed to be the pure M car, the one dedicated to drivers who care about chassis balance and precision above all else. However, this new, while admittedly not the purest M3 of all, is a brilliant performance machine, as evidenced by this new video. In the video, YouTuber Joe Achilles pits his own rear-wheel drive BMW M3 Competition against the all-wheel drive BMW M3 Competition xDrive in a drag race.

We all know which car is faster — it’s the M3 xDrive. With its extra grip, the M3 xDrive can launch far better than the standard car, so it’s no surprise that it’s faster. It’s seeing how much faster that’s surprising. Both cars have identical power specs.

They both use the same 3.0 liter twin-turbo I6 to make 503 horsepower and 369 lb-ft of torque. They also both use an eight-speed automatic gearbox. The main differences, obviously, are their drivetrains but also their weights. The xDrive model is a bit heavier, due to the added running gear, but its added grip is able to overcome that weight advantage.

In addition to its added traction, the BMW M3 xDrive has another advantage in drag races — gearing. In the rear-wheel drive car, launch control starts in second gear, as just the rear tires alone can’t handle all of the torque on launch in first gear.

The xDrive car can handle first gear, though, which allows it to launch far harder. And that’s noticeable in this video. No offense to Achilles’ rear-drive car but it got lunched by the BMW M3 xDrive, which seemed to sprint away from it. It honestly wasn’t even fair. Achilles, though, is a great sport and laughs as the xDrive call pulls away with ease.

Of course, drag racing is only a very small aspect of BMW M3 ownership, as most M3 owners typically prioritize handling and dynamics. However, the performance of the xDrive model is undeniable, purist or not. Click below to also see our own drag race between the BMW M4 RWD and M4 xDrive.

Is xDrive better than Quattro?

BMW xDrive® – is an electronic all-wheel drive system. xDrive® uses a multi-plate clutch system to electronically adjust torque distribution every 0.1 seconds based on current driving conditions. The biggest difference between xDrive® and quattro® is the axle balance.

BMW gives their cars a standard rear-balance BMW feel with 40% of torque in the front axle and 60% in the rear. That distribution is automatically adjusted on the fly as the system detects wheels slipping. The drawback is that this system can also adjust in normal conditions without input from the driver.

BMW X-Drive® is available on most BMW vehicles.

What is the difference between BMW xDrive and non xDrive?

The sDrive and xDrive names pepper BMW’s model range, but what do these terms mean? We explain all If you’re looking to buy a BMW, you may well have come across cars advertised as being sDrive and xDrive, with no immediate explanation for what these terms mean.