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Review Question How Could The Proximity Principle Help You Find A Career That You Love?

Review Question How Could The Proximity Principle Help You Find A Career That You Love?
The Proximity Principle demystifies the questions about who you need to know and where you need to be in order to find new opportunities. This is the proven strategy that will lead to the career you love.

What is the proximity principle in career?

The Proximity Principle—What Is It? – Sounds really fancy, doesn’t it? But what the heck does it mean? The Proximity Principle is a simple, straightforward strategy Ken came up with when he was reflecting on how the right opportunities “just happened” in his own life. The truth is, nothing magical happened. Instead, it was hard work, discipline and a lineup of “rights” that made things click. Get Everything You Need to Land the Job You Love! The Proximity Principle: The right people + the right places = opportunities. If you use this principle when it comes to landing your dream job, it will make all the difference in the world. For the ideal opportunity to find you (aka your dream job), you have to put yourself in contact with the right people who are connected to the right places.

What is the proximity principle in marketing?

Key Quote “You were created to fill a unique role. The world needs you to fill it” (p.205). — Ken Coleman Key Points Introduction “That first step toward a dream job is always the scariest” (p.5). But once you are ready to be bold, you can begin. What Is the Proximity Principle? Identifying “opportunities to do what you love is as simple as getting around the right people and being in the right places” (p.8).

Coleman explains that, “The right people + The right places = Opportunities” (p.14). The People The Professors. Seek out people – Coleman calls them “professors” – who know how to do what you want to do. Professors will have these traits: “1. They Are Knowledgeable 2. They Are Passionate 3. They Push You to Grow” (pp.26-27).

The Professionals. Seek out professionals who have mastered the skills needed to do what you have needed to do. Professionals will have these traits: “1. They Are Experienced 2. They Study Other Professionals” (p.34). The Mentors. Seek out mentors – people who guide and encourage you in a caring way – and do it for others.

Mentors should have these three traits: “1. They Are Accomplished 2. They Are Understanding 3. They Are Caring” (p.50). The Peers. Surround yourself with peers who are also motivated. Helpful peers will have these traits: “1. They Have Shared Values 2. They Have Drive 3. They Speak Truth” (p.66). The Producers.

These are the people who are running things in your dream field. They can help you “get in closer proximity to your dream job: 1. They Share Knowledge 2. They Provide Connections 3. They Offer Opportunities 4. They Give Direction” (p.76). The Places The Place Where You Are.

How many epic businesses have been started in someone’s garage? Get started with your own “zip code” – that is, metaphorically speaking, where you are right now. Have some grit and then get started (p.96)! A Place to Learn. Research about your field can help you “understand what you need to learn” and “where you need to learn it” (p.101).

A Place to Practice. Practicing your intended craft ¬(in an internship, an apprenticeship, a volunteer capacity, etc) helps you learn by doing and gives you the freedom to fail. Coleman quotes Jennifer Westfeldt, who said, “I think we all learn by doing rather than thinking about doing” (p.111).

  1. A Place to Perform.
  2. Small beginnings yield great rewards.
  3. Jobs, including entry-level jobs, are places which show you three things: “1.
  4. How to Handle Pressure 2.
  5. When to Pivot” and “3.
  6. Confirmation” that you are on the right track (p.133).
  7. A Place to Grow.
  8. There comes a time in your career where you need to seek a place to grow.

The right environment will have “1. Alignment of Values 2. A Healthy Challenge 3. A Clear Path Forward” (p.144). The Practices Creating a Web of Connectors. To reach people who will help you with dream opportunities, you should, “1. Inform Your Inner Circle 2.

Create a Connection To-Do List 3. Connect with the People on Your List” (p.163). Making Your Connections Count. With those around you, “1. Listen 2. Be Humble 3. Add Value” (p.176). Seizing the Opportunity. Craft a “custom” resume for each job, but remember “producers hire people for jobs – not paper” (p.183).

Bring the right attitude and appearance to an interview, and follow up “the right way and soon after” (p.188). Adopting a Proximity Mind-set. No matter your line of work, live with the understanding that your mind-set about your work must be nurtured. “1.

Now Your Role 2. Accept That Role 3. Maximize Your Role” (p.193). Pressing on. Even when you falter or encounter failures, “Press on!” (p.205). Key Concepts: Part I: The People The People to Look For “People who can help you land your dream job are working hard at this very moment. But they’re working for themselves, not for you” (p.14).

To get one of these people to help you, you can’t seek them out solely because you believe they will lead to an opportunity. People will only help if they want to help you. Being an enthusiastic learner or helping them solve a problem they currently have is a great way to show people you are interested in helping them (pp.15-16).

  • Look for people you can both give help to and get help from” (p.16).
  • The Professors No matter who you are, you will need someone to learn from who has the skills and experience in the field you want to work in.
  • These people can be thought of as “professors” (pp.26-27).
  • The first quality of a great professor is that they are knowledgeable and possess qualifications or certifications necessary to be successful in your desired field.

With their breadth of experience, what makes a professor great is their ability to make complex matters understandable (p.27). Another key quality in a professor is passion, best seen through their desire to spread their knowledge and inspire others to learn more (p.27).

  1. Great professors “push you to grow.” They force you to improve.
  2. No matter how great your professors are, though, it is up to you to become a dedicated, lifelong learner (p.28).
  3. The Professionals Professionals are people who excel in their field.
  4. They possess two key qualities: experience and deep knowledge of other professionals (pp.34-35).

“You have to learn from the best of the best in order to become one of the best” (p.40). When you approach interactions with professionals, have three goals. “1. Learn Their Tricks of the Trade 2. Develop Your Own Method 3. Understand that Wisdom Comes from Experience” (p.40).

The Mentors Mentors have faced their share of obstacles and know how difficult the journey to success can be. This “been there, done that” attitude can provide you with perspective (pp.50-51). “Mentors are people who can guide, encourage, and hold you accountable as you make the climb to your dream job” (p.48).

A great mentor knows what’s important to you, keeps your best interest in mind, and tells you hard truths even when they are uncomfortable. They know what you need to hear to reach your development goals (p.51). Having a mentor in every stage of your career is crucial.

Clearly communicate expectations with your mentor – for example, the cadence and length of your meetings. A successful mentor-mentee relationship will encourage you to create other relationships with young professionals and “pass the torch” as you gain more experience (pp.52-58). The Peers Peers are those walking next to you on your journey to success.

They can be coworkers, siblings, classmates, or others. They are meant to encourage and push you to succeed, often because they are on similar journeys (p.63). Peers possess three qualities: “shared values,” “drive,” and honesty. They should help you feel challenged, inspired, and encouraged (pp.66).

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The Producers Producers are influential people who create jobs and opportunities for others. While professors are interested in helping you grow, producers are interested in their own success (pp.75-76). Producers are connected to other producers who may help you on your climb and present you with new opportunities.

Producers also offer insight into where the market for your passion may be headed and can identify pitfalls or mistakes. Helping producers reach their own goals is the best way to encourage their support (pp.79-81). Part II: The Places The Place Where You Are Most people would be surprised by how many nearby opportunities can get them closer to their dream job.

People are no longer confined by their locations, as many companies offer remote opportunities (pp.90-93). The most important thing is to seize any relevant opportunities to get closer to your dream career (pp.93-96). A Place to Learn. A Place to Practice Everyone needs a comfortable environment to learn the skills necessary for success.

These places can be traditional (e.g., schools, workshops) or non-traditional (e.g., an aspiring producer working in a movie theater) (pp.101- 105). Most people opt to “keep their day job” and not dive headfirst into their dream career. Slowly practicing skills and integrating yourself into the culture of your next position is much more effective than putting your livelihood on the line.

  1. Imagine your future career and the skills needed to get there, and prepare incrementally (pp.106-109).
  2. In your place to practice, you’ll start to convert education into execution!” (p.111).
  3. When you practice, you gain “real experience,” valuable feedback from experienced professionals in the field, the “freedom to fail,” and “personal wins” which will help others, too (pp.112-113, 121).

In a place for practice, you can make mistakes and hone your craft as the stakes are relatively low. As these failures teach you more, you will experience “wins” that show you are in the right place and encourage you to keep going. Be prepared to practice in a place that is not glamorous and might pay nothing or very little, but nevertheless makes you excited (pp.118-125).

  • A Place to Perform Entry-level jobs typically get a bad reputation, but they are excellent places to learn how to perform.
  • In these positions, you will learn how to handle pressure, and you’ll understand how to determine if you are in the right place – or if you should pivot (pp.131-133).
  • Pressure will only increase as you climb, so you must learn to manage it.

Pivoting also enables you to understand when a topic, career choice, or decision was not the right one and effectively change your strategy or pursue something else (pp.133- 135). A Place to Grow It is important to recognize areas that will encourage and support you as you grow on your journey (p.141).

Alignment of values is crucial to finding a place to grow. You want to work somewhere that supports similar initiatives or morals as you, which will encourage you to work harder in pursuit of a shared goal. The workplace must also challenge you in a healthy way, pushing you to do things you never thought possible, while respecting your boundaries.

Finally, this “place to grow” should have a clear path forward, as pursuing your dream career could mean outgrowing your current role (pp.145- 150). Part III: The Practices Create a Web of Connections You know more people who can help you reach your dream job than you think.

It can be helpful to make a list of friends and family and branch out from there, identifying who may be able to lead you to opportunities (pp.160-163). Be creative and consider people you may not think of often beyond your close circle, like former teachers or neighbors (pp.164-166). Make Your Connections Count The best way to make these connections count is to listen, learn, be humble, and add value.

This will show that you are serious and dedicated, without being overbearing or rude (pp.176-178). Seizing the Opportunity Do not blast your resume out to prospective employers and expect them to respond. It is important to leverage your connections so your resume reaches people who will give you a chance.

While your resume is important, remember that “producers hire people for jobs – not paper” (p.183). Preparation, appearance, and attitude are all vital. Most hiring managers will judge you quickly, so it is important that you come off as professional and ready to win. Follow up after an interview with a quick note of thanks (pp.184-188).

Adopt a Proximity Mindset Adopting a proximity mindset is crucial but relatively simple if you follow the next three steps (p.192).1) You must understand your job and what “winning” in that role looks like. Start with position expectations. Ask your supervisor questions about each responsibility in your job description.

Research what makes other professionals in the same or similar roles stand out, and how they achieve great results (pp.193-194).2) Next, you need to accept that role, whether it is your dream position or not. Do this by bringing an “attitude of gratitude” to every responsibility you have, no matter how mundane.

Some positions may feel like a stepping stone but could become a cornerstone of your career and, later, a key to great success (pp.196-198).3) Lastly, maximize your role by delivering exceptional work and being proactive, demonstrating that you are ready for more responsibility. Review Question How Could The Proximity Principle Help You Find A Career That You Love? Identifying “opportunities to do what you love is as simple as getting around the right people and being in the right places.” Coleman explains that, “The right people + The right places = Opportunities”

Who wrote the proximity principle?

The Proximity Principle Right now, 70% of Americans aren’t passionate about their work and are desperately longing for meaning and purpose. They’re sick of “average” and know there’s something better out there, but they just don’t know how to reach it.

  1. One basic principle―The Proximity Principle―can change everything you thought you knew about pursuing a career you love.
  2. In his latest book, The Proximity Principle, national radio host and career expert Ken Coleman provides a simple plan of how positioning yourself near the right people and places can help you land the job you love.

Forget the traditional career advice you’ve heard! Networking, handing out business cards, and updating your online profile do nothing to set you apart from other candidates. Ken will show you how to be intentional and genuine about the connections you make with a fresh, unexpected take on resumes and the job interview process.

  1. You’ll discover the five people you should look for and the four best places to grow, learn, practice, and perform so you can step into the role you were created to fill.
  2. After reading The Proximity Principle, you’ll know how to connect with the right people and put yourself in the right places, so opportunities will come―and you’ll be prepared to take them.

: The Proximity Principle

What is an example of the principle of proximity in real life?

Example usage of proximity – Proximity is a very important part of making a text easy to read. For example, a headline must have more space before it then after. By being closer to the section it belongs to, it feels more connected to it. Line height is another example.

What is an example of proximity design principle?

What is an example of proximity in design? One example of the use of proximity in design is to group objects together within the piece. Using proximity to bring the objects closer together will prompt the viewer to naturally connect the objects together.

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Why is proximity important?

Proximity – Often we “stumble upon” friends or romantic partners; this happens partly due to how close in proximity we are to those people. Specifically, proximity or physical nearness has been found to be a significant factor in the development of relationships.

  1. For example, when college students go away to a new school, they will make friends consisting of classmates, roommates, and teammates (i.e., people close in proximity).
  2. Proximity allows people the opportunity to get to know one other and discover their similarities—all of which can result in a friendship or intimate relationship.

Proximity is not just about geographic distance, but rather functional distance, or the frequency with which we cross paths with others. For example, college students are more likely to become closer and develop relationships with people on their dorm-room floors because they see them (i.e., cross paths) more often than they see people on a different floor.

Why is proximity a valuable design principle?

Proximity is a valuable design principle because it allows you to organize information and visuals in the most effective way to convey information to the reader.

What are examples of proximity marketing?

Who Uses Proximity Marketing? – Many types of businesses use proximity-based marketing. For example, major retailers show proximity ads to potential consumers who are near their premises. If you’ve ever seen an ad for a discount coupon just as you happen to walk by Macy’s then that’s proximity-based marketing.

  1. Another example is inside a shopping mall, where you can see ads for maps and discount coupons that you can use inside the premises.
  2. Restaurants and fast-food outlets use mobile proximity marketing to show promotions to passers-by and attract them inside.
  3. They can also show ads and coupons to existing customers to encourage them to come back, boosting repeat business.

In real estate, realtors can show ads to those in the market for new homes, rentals, or office space, depending on their location and behavior, Charitable organizations can use proximity advertising to get donations from people in particular localities.

Why is proximity important in relationships?

Proximity – Review Question How Could The Proximity Principle Help You Find A Career That You Love? Figure 4.2 Great and important relationships can develop by chance and physical proximity helps. For example, seeing someone regularly on your daily bus commute to work or school may be all that’s necessary to spark a genuine friendship. By: Cheri Lucas Rowlands Source: Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0 Often we “stumble upon” friends or romantic partners; this happens partly due to how close in proximity we are to those people.

Specifically, or physical nearness has been found to be a significant factor in the development of relationships. For example, when college students go away to a new school, they will make friends consisting of classmates, roommates, and teammates (i.e., people close in proximity). Proximity allows people the opportunity to get to know one other and discover their similarities—all of which can result in a friendship or intimate relationship.

Proximity is not just about geographic distance, but rather, or the frequency with which we cross paths with others. For example, college students are more likely to become closer and develop relationships with people on their dorm-room floors because they see them (i.e., cross paths) more often than they see people on a different floor.

What is proximity in social psychology?

Proximity and the Mere Exposure Effect in Social Psychology What are the factors that affect the attraction between people? Social Psychology is a sub-branch of Psychology which investigates the relationship between people and the factors that affect these relationships.

According to Social Psychology, one of the factors of attraction is “Proximity Effect”. Proximity Effect is related to the time that people spend together. A lot of research found out that there is a positive correlation between the amount of time spent together and the attraction between people. For example, students who sit next to each other are more likely to become friends in a class.

We can see the power of physical proximity in our relationships as well. Another research found a similar result: Festinger, Schachter, and Back (1950) made a research about the students who study in university and stay in a dormitory at the same time.

  • They realized that the students whose rooms are next to each other are more likely become friends than students whose rooms are on different floors.
  • The continuation and prevalence of this proximity revealed “The Mere Exposure Effect” in the research field.
  • The Mere Exposure Effect is simply a psychological phenomenon whereby people feel a preference for people or things simply because they are familiar.

For example, babies smile at the people who smile at them more. In another research, Pew (2006) indicates that 38% of people who are married or have a long-term relationship become acquainted with each other in the same job, school, sports center or church.

  1. According to this research, the attraction between people increases with the increase in encounters between them.
  2. Therefore, we can see the importance of Mere Exposure Effect in the decisions of people.
  3. One of the most powerful explanations of this effect is the evolutionary perspective.
  4. The evolutionary perspective claims that the preferences of people towards objects and conditions depend on the familiarity.

With all these examples and explanations we can say that Proximity Effect and The Mere Exposure Effect have an influence on the preference of people towards people, objects, and conditions. As a consequence of this influence, Neuromarketing research about products and consumers bring a new perspective to the research field of Proximity and The Mere Exposure Effect.

What is proximity moral philosophy?

From an ethics of proximity, it means that there should be a priority to the relational and particularistic care itself that cannot be fully overridden by impartial justice. Second, some ethical values are fundamental in medical care and nursing care.

How does proximity influence perception?

Principle #3: proximity – The principle of proximity states that things that are close together appear to be more related than things that are spaced farther apart. Source: Andy Rutledge Proximity is so powerful that it overrides similarity of color, shape, and other factors that might differentiate a group of objects. Source: Steven Bradley Notice the three groups of black and red dots above? The relative nearness of the objects has an even stronger influence on grouping than color does.

What are three things you can use proximity to create in a design?

Proximity – Proximity is the grouping and shaping of objects in a composition. In design we use proximity for two main reasons:

  1. To Create Connections Proximity can create relationships between visual elements in a composition, create relevance, hierarchy, create organization and structure.
  2. To Dispel Connections Proximity can also be used to suggest no relationship between elements, to break organization and structure.

By moving visual elements closer together or further apart, we are applying the proximity design principle. In design these two forces can be applied in various degrees to help achieve a particular effect or outcome to communicate a message. Typically in design, related elements should be grouped together so that they will be viewed as a group.

  1. Unrelated elements should have distance and should not be in close proximity to each other.
  2. Audiences will assume that elements that are not near each other in a design are not closely related.
  3. A good sense of proximity in design can help differentiate visual elements to reduce visual clutter and make design more comprehensible.

Proximity is influential to the balance and hierarchy design principles. Space between visual elements will communicate a particular dynamic on a page. Depending on the intended purpose or look and feel, a designer must sense which type of balance to execute to suggest hierarchy. Audiences should never have to work at trying to figure out which caption goes with which graphic or whether or not a line of text is a subtitle or a line of text unrelated to the title. Viewers should never have to work trying to figure out the connection of information in a design. In the above examples we have three individual shapes. If placed together with just the right proximity, negative space is made to suggest a new visual shape entirely. This gives new meaning to the individual shapes that make this composition. If we move them even slightly this visual/message is lost. If we take the above most simplest and well known shapes and alter their proximity, they no longer have their meaning and become something entirely different. However simple or complex, it’s the relationship or lack of relationship between shapes that can trigger feelings, convey messages, engage an audience, add emphasis to a portion of the layout and create dynamics,

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What are the 7 principles of design proximity?

The principles of design are the rules a designer must follow to create an effective and attractive composition. The fundamental principles of design are: Emphasis, Balance and Alignment, Contrast, Repetition, Proportion, Movement and White Space. Design differs from art in that it has to have a purpose.

  • Visually, this functionality is interpreted by making sure an image has a center of attention, a point of focus.
  • Maybe you’re thinking, ‘But wait! I thought design was all about creativity?’ If you’re an entrepreneur or designer who’s just starting out, you might be tempted to go wild and combine the first five typefaces and colors that catch your eye, believing you’re creating something fresh and new.

You will probably find yourself with a design that is muddled, unfinished, or well, just plain ugly. Graphic design, like any discipline, adheres to strict rules that work beneath the surface to make the work stable and balanced. If the design is missing that balance, it will be weak and ineffective.

Emphasis Balance and alignment Contrast Repetition Proportion Movement White space

What is love proximity?

Proximity means geographical closeness. An obvious and basic requirement for forming a relationship is that the people involved need to be geographically close enough to have opportunities to interact with each other. You may find a certain film star very attractive but if you never get the chance to meet them or talk to them then you’ll have no chance of forming a relationship.

If you examine friendship patterns of people living in blocks of flats then they will be much more likely to be friendly with the people who live near them on the same floor than with people living on different floors just because they have more opportunities to meet and get to know each other. Similarly people are more likely to form friendships at work with the people working near them and students will be more likely to form friendships with people studying the same subject and attending the same classes.

Having more chances to interact with another person means that we become more familiar with that person and numerous studies have shown that we prefer people who are familiar to us rather than strangers. This is known as the ‘mere exposure effect’ (Robert B.

Zajonc, 1968) which states that the more often we are exposed to a stimulus whether it is a sound, picture or person the more positively we will rate that stimulus. The reason why we are more likely to be attracted to people we meet more often may be because we feel more secure with people that we know.

However, we are also more likely to be in regular close proximity to people with whom we share interests: working together, undertaking leisure activities, being within the same friendship group and similar social circumstances. You will see in the next section that similarity also has a part to play in attraction.

What is proximity in leadership?

The antiquated assumption that those who work from home are less productive than those who work from the office has given rise to “visibility” concerns. In a recent survey, 42% of managers said they sometimes forget about remote workers when assigning tasks.

Instill an “excellence from anywhere culture”: First, help your organization openly acknowledge proximity bias as a potential issue. Next, commit to paying more attention. Notice when you might be falling into proximity bias, and redirect your focus to include those who contribute remotely. Collectively, practice valuing deliverables, collaboration, and innovation, as opposed to employee location. Mitigate “face time” concerns: To address the problem of decreased face time with remote workers, initiate more frequent (weekly or biweekly), low-stakes performance evaluations or one-on-one check-ins. Use these meetings to become more aware of your team members work, and also let them know that their work is visible to you. Push for equal treatment: If you work at an organization that allows you to make your own team rules, take advantage. For example, you may ask your team to show up every Friday for an in-person team building activity, but empower them to choose whether or not to commute Monday through Thursday.

The recent shift to remote and hybrid work has created a “visibility” concern for many employees. Proximity bias describes how people in positions of power tend to treat workers who are physically closer to them more favorably, and stems from the antiquated assumption that those who work remotely are less productive than those who work from the office.

This concern is not unwarranted. Last year, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) released findings from a survey of more than 800 supervisors. SHRM reported two-thirds (67%) of supervisors overseeing remote workers admitted to believing remote workers are more replaceable than onsite workers.

Forty-two percent said they sometimes forget about remote workers when assigning tasks. This may explain why remote workers get promoted less often than their peers, despite being 15% more productive on average. These findings are problematic for several reasons, with one of them being that prejudice against remote workers exacerbates other inequities in the workplace.

  • We know that underrepresented groups have a stronger desire for hybrid and remote work — one survey found that 21% of white knowledge workers want to return to full-time, on-site work compared to just 3% of Black knowledge workers.
  • Professionals from marginalized communities still suffer from discrimination and microaggressions in the office.

Working remotely lessens the chance that they will encounter these prejudices and the pressure to constantly code-switch, For many BIPOC workers, permanent remote work equates to better mental health, When proximity bias combines with unconscious bias, the result is a toxic brew that has the potential to seriously harm organizational cultures and undermine DEI efforts.

What are the 7 principles of design proximity?

The principles of design are the rules a designer must follow to create an effective and attractive composition. The fundamental principles of design are: Emphasis, Balance and Alignment, Contrast, Repetition, Proportion, Movement and White Space. Design differs from art in that it has to have a purpose.

Visually, this functionality is interpreted by making sure an image has a center of attention, a point of focus. Maybe you’re thinking, ‘But wait! I thought design was all about creativity?’ If you’re an entrepreneur or designer who’s just starting out, you might be tempted to go wild and combine the first five typefaces and colors that catch your eye, believing you’re creating something fresh and new.

You will probably find yourself with a design that is muddled, unfinished, or well, just plain ugly. Graphic design, like any discipline, adheres to strict rules that work beneath the surface to make the work stable and balanced. If the design is missing that balance, it will be weak and ineffective.

Emphasis Balance and alignment Contrast Repetition Proportion Movement White space