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How Long Does A Pip Review Decision Take?

How Long Does A Pip Review Decision Take
The letter you received is a standard letter they send everyone. There’s no timescales at this stage. Once the report was returned a decision can take up to 12 weeks. Once a decision is made you will be sent the decision letter.

How long does it take for a PIP review to go through?

Review – Your award of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) may be reviewed by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) at any time, even if you have an award for a fixed amount of time. The DWP will usually start to review your claim one year before your award ends.

  1. When the DWP reviews your claim, they send you a letter with a PIP review form.
  2. The DWP gives you 4 weeks to fill in the form and send it back.
  3. Ask the DWP for more time if you need it.
  4. You will need to phone them and tell them why you need more time.
  5. If you don’t send the form back in time, the DWP will stop your claim unless you have a good reason for sending it in late.

You will need to tell them why you sent the form late. If the DWP stop your claim because you sent the form back too late and they don’t think that you have a good reason, you can start again with a new claim or challenge their decision (or both). You don’t have to do the form on your own.

  • You can ask someone else to help you.
  • It can be someone you know or you can find a benefits adviser near you using our Find an Adviser tool,
  • If something has changed, the DWP may need more information to let the claim continue.
  • You may need to complete another claim form and attend another medical assessment.

In a review, the DWP will decide whether to:

Make your PIP award longer Change your entitlement End your PIP claim.

How successful are PIP reviews?

Page 2 – Many people are put off applying for PIP because they have heard that it is very difficult to get an award for their particular condition. Yet Benefits and Work research shows that in some cases pessimism about the outcome is not supported by the statistics.

  • We asked readers to tell us which conditions they thought were particularly hard to claim for.
  • One condition that came up repeatedly was fibromyalgia.
  • Lorraine told us:

“Fibromyalgia is a hard one to claim for as it is quite a complex condition with no definitive diagnosis. If you dare to say you have good days, you are doomed to failure.” Whilst we agree that saying you have ‘good’ rather than ‘better’ days is unlikely to help your claim, the reality is that the success rate for PIP claims for fibromyalgia is 62.7%, considerably above the average.

  1. Similarly, ZuluAssegai believed that ME/CFS was one of the harder conditions to claim for: “The condition ME/CFS is very hard to get DLA/PIP for as it is a disabling, fluctuating condition and it is a hidden disability.
  2. It doesn’t fit the tick box format.” Yet the success rate for chronic fatigue syndrome is 54.8%, slightly above average.

Osteoporosis was another condition a number of readers mentioned, with Anne telling us “It doesn’t even seem to be recognized.” In fact, 67.6% of claims where the primary condition is osteoporosis get an award, again considerably above the average. Autism is a condition that some people felt would not be easy to get PIP for.

  1. But the award rate is actually very much higher than average, at 72.3%.
  2. Yet for Asperger’s syndrome the award rate is just below the average, at 51.1%, even though, as Porridge explained: “,
  3. Any of us with Asperger Syndrome will already be aware our lives are very tough, especially if you are quite far along the spectrum, and it is a fact that we are just as autistic as anyone else with autism and we are also likely to have other problems like dyslexia, dyspraxia, severe anxiety and other significant difficulties.” Other conditions also present a mixed picture.

As kysgillett explained: “Epilepsy is invisible (most of the time) and fluctuating (all of the time). It is also a complex condition with many different types of seizures. It is very difficult for someone who may be unconscious to explain how being unconscious affects them.

It is difficult to get any award without having to go to a tribunal.” Our statistics don’t tell us how many people had to go to a tribunal before getting their award, but our reader’s opinion that it’s a complex situation with many different types of seizure was borne out by the statistics. Generalised seizures (with status epilepticus in last 12 months) attracted a higher than average award rate at 58.7%.

But partial seizures (with status epilepticus in last 12 months) was below average with 47.6%. However, there were four other classifications of seizures, with some getting awards above and some below the average:

  • Partial seizures (without status epilepticus in last 12 months) 40.2%
  • Generalised seizures (without status epilepticus in last 12 months) 50.1%
  • Seizures – unclassified 54.1%
  • Non epileptic Attack disorder (pseudoseizures) 59.2%

Diabetes is another condition where award rates vary depending on the type of diabetes, although all of the awards are below average. Reader CP explained that: “It’s generally accepted by parents of children with Type 1 diabetes that, whilst their children will be entitled to DLA at at least middle rate, the chances of them getting PIP when due to transfer is virtually zero.

  • Diabetes mellitus Type 1 (insulin dependent) 28.2%
  • Diabetes mellitus (category unknown) 45.6%
  • Diabetes insipidus 45.7%
  • Diabetes mellitus Type 2 (non insulin dependent) 45.8%

Kim warned that you: “Cannot claim pip for Crohn’s disease!! They totally disregard this disabling condition.” Again, this isn’t quite the case, but it definitely is far below the average with a 30.7% success rate. Nika1000 suggested endometriosis as a hard condition to claim for, in spite of the fact that it is: “A life limiting disease.

  1. But whilst there is no question that some conditions are very much harder to claim for than others, it’s definitely worth considering making a claim even if yours is one of the least successful health issues.
  2. The likelihood is that you will have a better than one in four chance of getting an award and, for most conditions, it is likely to be better than a 50/50 chance.
  3. And some of the conditions which it is assumed are the hardest of all, such as ME/CFS and fibromyalgia, actually have an above average success rate.
  4. Members can download the full list of conditions and percentage success rates in a pdf file entitled ‘Success rates for PIP claims by condition’ from the ‘Claims’ section of the,

: Chances of PIP success may be better than you think

What happens when your PIP is up for review?

How PIP reviews work – You will continue to get PIP while your claim is being reviewed.

You’ll get a letter asking you to fill in a form called ‘Award review – how your disability affects you’. Fill in the form using the notes that come with it. Send the form and any supporting information you have not shared with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) before – the form explains what to include and where to send it. You’ll need to return it within 1 month. Contact the PIP enquiry line if you need more time. DWP will review your form. If they need more information, an independent health professional might phone you to ask some questions or send a letter inviting you to an assessment. Assessments can be in person, over the phone or by video call. You’ll get a letter that tells you what will happen with your PIP. If your needs have changed, your PIP might be increased, reduced or stopped.

Because of coronavirus (COVID-19), you’ll only be invited to an assessment in person if more information is needed and you cannot do an assessment by phone or video call. Your invitation letter will explain how to attend your appointment safely,

How long does PIP take to review 2023?

Forum Members forums ESA, PIP and DLA Queries and Results PIP Renewal timescale 2023.

1 month 1 week ago #279016 by Rossi222 How long is the PIP Renewal process taking? I returned my form 10 weeks ago. My Motability Car lease is due to end and the process for changing starts 31st March. In January 2021, my PIP was extended to December 2023., so I will have to ask for an extension on the lease as I have less than 12 months left on my award.

Everything seems so far behind, with no communication, it just adds to the already nerve wracking experience. A rough idea of the timescale would be great. Also, are there any figures on how many renewals are being decided without an interview, to help clear the backlog? Many thanks Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.1 month 1 week ago #279023 by BIS Hi Rossi222 I’m afraid I can’t offer you any sort of timescale because we just don’t know.

Some people are hearing within 8 weeks, and some are taking up to 18 months. They are dealing with a backlog, and the majority of people are being given a video or a telephone assessment. Some people have been given a paper-based assessment, but I have noticed that many of the award lengths seem to be short.

Forum Members forums ESA, PIP and DLA Queries and Results PIP Renewal timescale 2023.

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How do I know if my PIP assessment went well?

Check what the mobility scores mean – If you get between 8 and 11 points in total, you’ll get the mobility component of PIP at the standard rate. If you get at least 12 points in total, you’ll get the mobility component at the enhanced rate.

Is PIP backdated after review?

Getting your mandatory reconsideration result – The DWP doesn’t have to make the decision within a specific timescale and sometimes it can take several months to get your decision letter – this letter is called a ‘mandatory reconsideration notice’. You’ll be sent 2 copies – you’ll need to send 1 off if you need to go to the next stage of appeal.

If the DWP change their decision, you’ll start getting your PIP payment straight away. Your payment for PIP be backdated. If the decision was about a new claim, they’ll backdate your PIP to the date you made the claim. If the decision was about an ongoing claim, they’ll backdate your PIP to the date it was stopped or reduced.

Don’t be put off if they don’t change the decision, not many decisions are overturned at this stage. More decisions are changed after the second stage of the challenge – if your mandatory reconsideration is turned down you can appeal to a tribunal,

How far behind are PIP reviews?

The latest figures from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) show that at the end of October 2022, claims for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) were taking 16 weeks to process from point of registration to the decision being made. The statistics also indicate that it is taking 11 weeks from the time of the assessment provider’s referral to the decision being made.

While waiting four months for a new claim to be processed may seem like a long time, it has actually come down from 24 weeks for the end-to-end journey recorded in October 2021. Similarly, the 11-week wait from assessment to decision is a reduction of five weeks from the 16 weeks recorded in 2021. In November 2022, DWP said that reducing customer journey times for PIP claimants is a “priority for the department and we are working constantly to make improvements to our service”.

While an 16-week wait may provide little comfort for anyone considering making a new claim for the benefit – or those already midway through the journey – it’s worth keeping in mind that successful claims are backdated to the point of application. A successful claim for PIP is worth between £24.45 and £156.90 each week.

  • As the benefit is paid every four weeks, this means people with a long-term illness, disability, mental or physical health condition could receive regular payments of between £97.80 and £627.60.
  • DWP shared its plans after former SNP MP, Margaret Ferrier, asked what steps are being taken to reduce PIP delays and waiting times.

In a written response in November, Minister or Disabled People, Tom Pursglove, said: “We are committed to ensuring people can access financial support through Personal Independence Payment (PIP) in a timely manner, taking into account the need to review all available evidence.

Using a blend of phone, video and face-to-face assessments to support customers and deliver a more efficient and user-centred service Increasing case manager and assessment provider health professional resources Prioritising new claims, while safeguarding claimants awaiting award reviews, who have returned their information as required, to ensure their payments continue until their review can be completed

The latest statistics from the DWP show that by the end of October, there were more than three million people across the country claiming PIP. The regional breakdown includes nearly 330,000 claimants living in Scotland, 2.6 million in England and 226,000 in Wales.

What percentage of people win a PIP appeal?

Initial Decisions through to MR and Appeal, April 2013 to June 2022 (Experimental statistics) – How Long Does A Pip Review Decision Take Source: PIP Statistics to October 2022, Table 5A For initial PIP decisions following an assessment during the period April 2013 to June 2022:

  • there were 4.7 million initial decisions following a PIP assessment, and 64% were awarded PIP
  • 1.1 million MRs have been registered about the 4.7 million initial decisions
  • 21% of completed MRs resulted in a change to the award (excluding withdrawn)
  • 37% of completed MRs then lodged an appeal
  • 15% of appeals lodged were “lapsed” (which is where DWP changed the decision in the customer’s favour after an appeal was lodged but before it was heard at tribunal)
  • 68% of the DWP decisions cleared at a tribunal hearing were “overturned” (which is where the decision is revised in favour of the customer)
  • 9% of initial decisions following a PIP assessment have been appealed and 4% have been overturned at a tribunal hearing

Considering trends over time, the proportion of:

  • MRs resulting in a change to the award has reduced (by 4 percentage points to 13%) in the most recent quarter of initial decision (April to June 2022) compared to the previous quarter, and is 28 percentage points lower than the same quarter the previous year
  • appeals lodged which were lapsed gradually increased from 2015 to 2016 to reach 37% across the 2020 to 2021 financial year
  • initial decisions following an assessment which have been appealed has gradually increased over time – from around 6% over the first couple of years when PIP was introduced, to 9% in 2019 to 2020
  • initial decisions following an assessment overturned at a tribunal hearing gradually increased and was 4% in 2019 to 2020 – though as these statistics are grouped by initial decision date, numbers could increase for later periods as more appeals are completed
See also:  How To Delete Amazon Review?

National Tables 5A – F accompanying this release give information by date of initial decision (quarter and financial year) and other factors including geography.

Can a PIP decision be quick?

Forum Members forums ESA, PIP and DLA Queries and Results Has anyone had a quick Pip Decision after a telephone Assesment?

2 months 4 weeks ago #277453 by shocksl I had mine last week. Receieved a text stating that I will hear within 8 weeks from the DPW. I guess my question is, has anybody on here had it quicker? or do they usually drag out the full 8 weeks? Lastly, will there be more assesments i.e face to face, physical examinations etc? Medical checks? Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.2 months 4 weeks ago #277461 by BIS Hi shocksl Eight weeks is an approximate time frame.

You may hear earlier, you may hear at exactly the eight-week mark, or it may be even longer. There won’t be any more assessments. If the DWP requires any further information – eg from the GP – they will contact them. (This rarely happens). BIS Nothing on this board constitutes legal advice – always consult a professional about specific problems Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.2 months 4 weeks ago #277481 by Ali Hi, I had my telephone assessment yesterday.

Not got a clue how it went and spent half last night mulling it over. This morning l got the text saying they had the assessment report & 6-8 weeks etc. I rang DWP & asked for a copy of the report which they are sending today. It won’t give me final answers but l’ll have an inkling which way it’s going to go & have extra time to work on any further action l might need (hopefully none).

Might be worth a call? Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.2 months 3 weeks ago #277527 by denby Hi Ali, when you get your PA4, if it is point-losingly inaccurate, if you are quick you can write to contest it. Write to ‘The Decision Maker’ at last address they wrote from. Avoid ever accusing of lying even if they actually did.

Keep it cold and neutral, ‘appears to have overlooked,’ ‘has not taken xy document into account’ etc This can save an MR and appeal – I’m sure it did last time with our daughter, Hope it isn’t necessary but if it is, go for it ASAP. Thanks again to B&W as I learned about this chance on here – DWP don’t advertise it! best, Denby The following user(s) said Thank You: Gary, Ali Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Forum Members forums ESA, PIP and DLA Queries and Results Has anyone had a quick Pip Decision after a telephone Assesment?

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Can PIP be stopped after review?

You might need to challenge the decision or start a new claim. It depends on the reason the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) stopped or reduced your PIP. The DWP might have stopped or reduced your PIP because:

you didn’t return a review form in time you’ve reached the end of your fixed-term PIP award you had a medical assessment and the DWP decided your condition has improved you missed a medical assessment you told the DWP about a change of circumstances and they decided you can’t get PIP any more the DWP is taking back a benefit overpayment you’ve been accused of benefit fraud

If the DWP say your PIP has stopped because you’re subject to immigration control, get help from an adviser, If you’re not sure why the DWP stopped or reduced your PIP, you can:

check any letters the DWP have sent you – they should explain what has happened call the PIP enquiry line and ask them to explain

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) enquiry line Telephone: 0800 121 4433 Textphone: 0800 121 4493 Relay UK – if you can’t hear or speak on the phone, you can type what you want to say: 18001 then 0800 121 4433 You can use Relay UK with an app or a textphone.

How long is the PIP review backlog?

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has shared how it is tackling the backlog of new claims for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) and taking steps to reduce the waiting time for claimants. The average processing time for a new claim is now 16 weeks, a significant reduction from 26 weeks in August 2021.

DWP said that reducing customer journey times for PIP claimants is a “priority for the department and we are working constantly to make improvements to our service”. While an 16-week wait may provide little comfort for anyone considering making a new claim for the benefit – or those already midway through the journey – it’s worth keeping in mind that successful claims are backdated.

A successful claim for PIP is currently worth between £24.45 and £156.90 each week. As the benefit is paid every four weeks, this means people with a long-term illness, disability, mental or physical health condition could receive regular payments of between £97.80 and £627.60.

DWP shared its plans after Labour MP Karin Smyth asked what steps are being taken to reduce the “backlog of people waiting on a PIP claim to be assessed. In a written response this week, Minister or Disabled People, Tom Pursglove, said: “We are committed to ensuring people can access financial support through Personal Independence Payment (PIP) in a timely manner.

“Reducing customer journey times for PIP claimants is a priority for the department, and we are working constantly to make improvements to our service. We always aim to make an award decision as quickly as possible, taking into account the need to review all the available evidence, including that from the claimant.” He added: “We are continuing to see an improvement in PIP clearance times, with the latest statistics showing that the average end-to-end journey has reduced each quarter from 26 weeks in August 2021, to 16 weeks at the end of October 2022.” He went on to explain the measure in place to help reduce processing times.

Using a blend of phone, video and face-to-face assessments to support customers and deliver a more efficient and user-centred service Increasing case manager and assessment provider health professional resources Prioritising new claims, while safeguarding claimants awaiting award reviews, who have returned their information as required, to ensure their payments continue until their review can be completed

To keep up to date with the latest PIP or Adult Disability Payment news, join our Money Saving Scotland Facebook page here, or subscribe to our newsletter which goes out daily, Monday to Friday – sign up here,

Can you track progress of PIP?

Tracking your Personal Independence Payment (PIP) appeal – If have appealed a PIP decision since 1 March 2018 (not before) and have chosen to have a face-to-face hearing you can register to use Track Your Appeal by calling 0300 123 1142, Monday to Friday, 8:30am to 5:00pm. Track your appeal can trigger an automated update to your phone or email account. Updates can include:

reminding you to send in evidence confirming your evidence has been received by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) reminding you of your appeal hearing date any responses from the DWP notifications if your appeal is postponed, adjourned or withdrawn

Further planned digital reforms include online appeal forms, evidence sharing and online decision making.

Do PIP text you when they have made a decision?

Forum Members forums ESA, PIP and DLA Queries and Results Just received text from DWP PIP

1 year 8 months ago #263224 by phrank Hi There, Have just received a text from the DWP. ‘We have received the written report of your PIP assessment. We will write to you once we’ve made a decision.’etc. It then goes on to state a timescale of within eight weeks for them to get back to me.

Does this mean they have done a paper-based assessment? And if so can I immediately request the report? Am shaking here in anticipation! Any advice as usual will be greatly appreciated. Thanks, regards, Phrank. Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.1 year 8 months ago #263227 by LL26 Hi Phrank, I think you may be right! A paper based assessment appears to have been done.

Wait a couple of days and then ask for a copy of the report. Good luck! LL26 Nothing on this board constitutes legal advice – always consult a professional about specific problems Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.1 year 8 months ago #263231 by ThisGovernmentsGoneToFar Phrank it sounds to me now they’ve have done a paper assessment.

  1. Give it a couple of days and ask for the assessment form PA3.
  2. Well done I can be quite sure you will be awarded something.
  3. Just to let you know, when I was transferred from DLA they at first wanted to do an assessment, but then my CPN talked to them and said how ridiculous he has sent you loads of proper medical evidence, they then did a paper assessment for me, and it’s an ongoing high rate both.

Wishing you well you’ve suffered enough. I was formely known as (GoingOffMyHeadWithThisGovernment) Won PIP November 2017 ongoing award HR both. Now kept and got my ESA Support group but took a while. Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.1 year 8 months ago #263239 by phrank Thanks everyone!! That’s a relief that something has happened at long last and it looks like a PB review has been done.

I don’t know if the phone call on Tuesday helped or initiated it but anyway I’ll phone tomorrow or Monday latest and ask for the PA3 report. Will obviously keep you posted. Kindest regards, Phrank Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.1 year 8 months ago #263243 by Susie27 Hi Phrank, Just wanted to send a message of support, and admiration! Your tenacity and determination have given me real hope for when my turn comes around.

Good on ya! Sending you vibes of hope, Susie Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation. Moderators: Gordon, Gary, BIS, Catherine, Wendy, Kelly, greekqueen, peter, Katherine, Super User, jimmck

Forum Members forums ESA, PIP and DLA Queries and Results Just received text from DWP PIP

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Can I check my PIP award online?

Our PIP test allows you to score yourself for the daily living and mobility components of PIP just by clicking with your mouse. It will do the maths for you, tell you what components you assess yourself as qualifying for and what rates you assess yourself as being eligible for.

It will even email you a copy of your test results if you decide to provide your email address – but that’s entirely up to you. But you do need to be aware that a decision maker using a report from a health professional working for the Independent Assessment Services (IAS), formerly known as ATOS, or for Capita may not reach the same conclusion that you do about your eligibility for PIP.

The PIP self-test is anonymous, and the results will appear in your browser as soon as you have completed the single page of multiple choice questions. But, if you wish, you can also have your PIP results emailed to you. Start the PIP test

Why would PIP call me after assessment?

The purpose of the phone call is to ensure the claimant understands the reason why PIP has not been awarded or has been awarded at a lower rate and to answer any questions or concerns that the claimant may have about the decision. DWP believes that this approach will minimise the number of disputes.

What are the chances of passing PIP assessment?

Success rates for PIP claims by condition The DWP record every successful PIP claim under one of over 500 different health conditions, depending on which one they think is your main source of points. The table below shows what percentage of claims for each condition are successful For comparison, the overall average success rate for PIP claims is 52%.

Cardiovascular disease – Other / type not known 49.60%
Abdomen – Injuries/Fracture/Dislocation Of 55.00%
Achondroplasia 86.10%
Acne Vulgaris 19.70%
Addison’s Disease 48.70%
Adhd / Add 49.70%
Adhesive Capsulitis (Frozen Shoulder) 39.50%
Adrenal Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 43.80%
Agoraphobia 65.20%
Alcohol Misuse 61.60%
Allergy No Risk Of Anaphylaxis 20.30%
Allergy Risk Of Anaphylaxis Unknown Or Not Fully Assessed 27.50%
Allergy With A Risk Of Anaphylaxis 26.50%
Amblyopia 59.20%
Amino Acid Metabolism – Disorders Of 37.10%
Amputation – Lower Limb(S) 88.50%
Amputation – Upper Limb(S) 76.70%
Amputations – Upper & Lower Limb/S 91.30%
Amyloidosis 82.10%
Anaemia – Aplastic 59.40%
Anaemia – B12 (Pernicious)/Folate Deficiency 35.10%
Anaemia – Iron Deficiency 33.50%
Anaemia – Sickle Cell 48.60%
Anaemias – Other / Type Not Known 42.00%
Aneurysm – Aortic 60.40%
Aneurysm – Cerebral 64.30%
Aneurysms – Other / Type Not Known 55.10%
Angina 55.60%
Angioedema 39.80%
Angiosarcoma 90.80%
Ankle And Foot Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 45.10%
Ankylosing Spondylitis 70.20%
Anorectal Abscess 37.30%
Anorexia Nervosa 71.20%
Anterior Uveitis (Iritis) 60.50%
Antiphospholipid Syndrome 61.70%
Anxiety Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 38.60%
Aortic Valve Disease 47.80%
Arterial Disease Excluding Coronary – Other / Type Not Known 57.90%
Arthritis – Psoriatic 69.30%
Arthritis – Reactive 68.60%
Asbestosis 74.60%
Ascites 76.90%
Asperger Syndrome 51.10%
Asthma 48.90%
Astigmatism 51.50%
Ataxia – Friedrich’s 92.50%
Ataxias – Other / Type Not Known 81.50%
Atherosclerosis (Pvd / Claudication) 64.40%
Atrial Fibrillation/Flutter 49.20%
Atrioseptal Defect (ASD) 56.90%
Attention To Artificial Opening Colostomy/Ileostomy/ Stoma – No Underlying Diagnosis 38.40%
Autism 72.30%
Autoimmune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopaenic Purpura (ITP) 42.90%
Autoimmune Disease – Other / Type Not Known 60.70%
Autoimmune Hepatitis 45.50%
Back Pain – Non Specific (Mechanical) 56.20%
Back Pain – Specific – Other / Type Not Known 68.80%
Bacterial Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 55.20%
Bedwetting (Enuresis) 33.30%
Behcet’s Disease 58.00%
Bipolar Affective Disorder (Hypomania / Mania) 61.30%
Bladder – Cancer Of 76.50%
Bladder Urethra Testes And Penis – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 28.00%
Blepharospasm 62.20%
Blood Disorders – Type Not Known 51.00%
Blood Vessels/Lymphatics – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 57.30%
Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) 51.80%
Bone – Other Cancers Of / Type Not Known 85.90%
Bowel (Colon Recturm Anus) – Cancer Of 87.20%
Brachial Plexus 76.10%
Bradycardia 36.90%
Brain And Spinal Cord – Cancer Of 91.30%
Breast – Cancer Of 80.20%
Bronchiectasis 65.10%
Bronchus – Cancer Of 96.60%
Buerger’s Disease 70.30%
Bulimia Nervosa 57.00%
Bullous Disease – Other / Type Not Known 40.10%
Burns 61.30%
Bursitis 50.20%
Cancers – Other / Type Not Known 78.40%
Carbohydrate Metabolism – Disorders Of 58.80%
Cardiac Arrhythmia – Pacemaker/Implantable Defibrillator Fitted 52.10%
Cardiac Arrhythmias – Other / Type Not Known 44.10%
Cardiac Failure 66.10%
Cardiomyopathy 56.30%
Cardiovascular Disease – Other / Type Not Known 49.70%
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome 45.90%
Cataplexy 50.30%
Cataract 58.00%
Cellulitis 65.70%
Cerebral Palsy – Ataxic 87.30%
Cerebral Palsy – Athetoid 98.50%
Cerebral Palsy – Diplegic 88.70%
Cerebral Palsy – Hemiplegic 88.40%
Cerebral Palsy – Other / Type Not Known 86.70%
Cerebral Palsy – Quadriplegic 99.50%
Cerebrovascular Accident (Stroke) 78.30%
Cerebrovascular Disease – Other / Type Not Known 67.70%
Cervical Disc Lesion 64.60%
Cervical Spondylosis 65.90%
Cervix – Cancer Of 84.30%
Charcot Marie Tooth Disease 75.20%
Chondromalacia Patellae 54.30%
Chondrosarcoma 85.60%
Chorioretinal Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 65.50%
Chromosomal Syndrome – Other Type / Not Known 77.40%
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) 54.80%
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Bronchitis/Emphysema 66.30%
Chronic Secretory Otitis Media 28.00%
Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media 35.20%
Cirrhosis – Alcohol Induced 64.80%
Cirrhosis – Autoimmune 54.50%
Cirrhosis – Other / Type Not Known 60.70%
Cleft Lip 52.60%
Cleft Lip With Cleft Palate 34.20%
Clotting Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 49.40%
Club Foot (Talipes) 51.90%
Coarctation Of The Aorta 48.10%
Coeliac Disease 27.70%
Cognitive Disorder Due To Stroke 88.60%
Cognitive Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 80.10%
Collagen And Elastic Tissue – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 48.00%
Colon – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 40.10%
Compartment Syndrome (Volkmann’s Ischaemia) 66.70%
Complications Of Prematurity 73.20%
Conduct Disorder (Including Oppositional Defiant Disorder) 58.30%
Conductive Hearing Loss – Other Causes Of / Type Not Known 31.50%
Conductive Hearing Loss Due To Trauma 31.70%
Conjunctiva Cornea Eyelids And Lacrimal Apparatus – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known) 54.80%
Constipation 28.40%
Conversion Disorder (Hysteria) 79.10%
Corneal Ulceration 51.50%
Coronavirus COVID-19 47.00%
Cortical Blindness 92.30%
Creutzfeldt – Jacob Disease (CJD) 100.00%
Crohns Disease 30.70%
Crystal Deposition Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 48.40%
Cushing’s Syndrome 60.00%
Cystic Fibrosis 61.30%
Deafness – Congenital 76.20%
Deep Vein Thrombosis 51.30%
Degenerative Neuronal Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 89.10%
Dementia 94.10%
Depressive Disorder 50.70%
Dermatitis Herpetiformis 33.70%
Dermatomyositis 73.80%
Diabetes Insipidus 45.70%
Diabetes Mellitus (Category Unknown) 45.60%
Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 (Insulin Dependent) 28.20%
Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 (Non Insulin Dependent) 45.80%
Diabetic Neuropathy 73.40%
Diabetic Retinopathy 77.80%
Diplopia (Double Vision) 45.70%
Disease Affecting Hearing & Balance – Other/ Type Not Known 44.60%
Dislocation Of The Hip – Congenital 77.90%
Dissociative Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 69.90%
Disturbances Of Consciousness – Non-Epileptic – Other / Type Not Known 55.70%
Diverticular Disease / Diverticulitis 33.70%
Dizziness – Cause Not Specified 39.60%
Down’s Syndrome 99.60%
Drop Attacks 62.40%
Drug Misuse 56.90%
Dupuytrens Contracture 54.00%
Dyslexia 22.30%
Dyspraxia 45.50%
Dystrophia Myotonica 76.90%
Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) 60.90%
Eczema – Varicose 28.40%
Eczema (Dermatitis) 20.40%
Ehlers Danlos Syndrome 69.20%
Elbow Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 42.60%
Empyema 62.80%
Endocrine Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 45.30%
Endometriosis 34.50%
Endometrium (Uterus / Womb) – Cancer Of 86.20%
Entropion 50.00%
Epidemolysis Bullosa 57.80%
Epiphyseal Dysplasia – Multiple 78.50%
Essential Tremor – Benign 66.00%
Ewing’s Sarcoma 88.00%
Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis 84.20%
Eye Movement – Other Disorders Of / Type Not Known 48.70%
Eyes – Injuries To 36.40%
Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy 82.90%
Factitious Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 52.00%
Faecal Soiling (Encopresis) 23.80%
Failure To Thrive 75.00%
Fallots Tetralogy 44.30%
Fibroids 26.30%
Fibromyalgia 62.70%
Fibrosarcoma 78.00%
Fibrosing Alveolitis 79.50%
Fistula In Anus 32.10%
Food Intolerance 21.00%
Fore Foot Pain (Metatarsalgia) 44.30%
Fracture Complications – Other / Type Not Known 66.60%
Fragile X Syndrome 91.90%
Gallbladder And Biliary Tract – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 45.10%
Gallstones 34.30%
Gastrointestinal Tract – Other Cancers Of / Type Not Known 90.70%
Gastrointestinal Tract – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 40.40%
Generalised Anxiety Disorder 42.70%
Generalised Musculoskeletal Disease – Other / Type Not Known 62.30%
Generalised Seizures (With Status Epilepticus In Last 12 Months) 58.70%
Generalised Seizures (Without Status Epilepticus In Last 12 Months) 50.10%
Genetic Disorders Dysplasias And Malformations – Other / Type Not Known 71.90%
Genitourinary Disease – Other / Type Not Known 36.20%
Genitourinary Tract – Other Cancers Of / Type Not Known 84.60%
Giant Cell Tumour – Malignant 78.00%
Glaucoma 63.10%
Glomerulonephritis 55.40%
Glucose 6 Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency 52.90%
Goitre 26.50%
Golfers Elbow (Medial Epicondylitis) 38.30%
Gout 45.40%
Granulomatous Lung Disease And Pulmonary Infiltration – Other / Type Not Known 68.80%
Growth Hormone Deficiency 54.10%
Guillain Barre Syndrome 80.50%
Haematological System – Other Cancers Of / Type Not Known 81.90%
Haemochromatosis 51.20%
Haemolytic Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 54.10%
Haemophilia A 57.80%
Haemophilia B (Christmas Disease) 64.30%
Haemorrhoids 21.10%
Hallux Valgus /Rigidus 39.70%
Head Injury – Cognitive And Sensorimotor Impairment 78.70%
Head Injury – Cognitive Impairment 74.10%
Head Injury – Sensorimotor Impairment 70.60%
Headache – Other Causes Of / Cause Not Known 30.20%
Hearing Loss – Mixed 41.30%
Heart And Lung Transplantation 76.90%
Heart Block 52.10%
Heart Disease – Congenital – Other / Type Not Known 53.40%
Heart Transplantation 66.50%
Hemianopia 62.20%
Hepatic Encephalopathy 76.80%
Hepatitis – Chronic – Other / Type Not Known 51.40%
Hepatitis B And D Infection 33.80%
Hepatitis C Infection 53.20%
Hereditary Multiple Exostosis (Diaphyseal Aclasis) 68.50%
Hereditary Spherocytosis 43.10%
Hernia 44.80%
Herpes Zoster – Ophthalmic 44.80%
Hiatus Hernia / Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease / Reflux Oesophagitis 33.70%
Hip Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 67.40%
Hirschprung Disease 31.60%
HIV/Aids 48.60%
Hodgkins Lymphoma 78.40%
Huntington’s Disease 85.00%
Hydrocephalus 65.40%
Hydronephrosis 39.40%
Hyperlipidaemia 55.40%
Hypermetropia (Long-Sighted) 48.10%
Hypermobility Syndrome 53.40%
Hyperparathyroidism 36.90%
Hypersensitivity Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 36.80%
Hypertension 47.10%
Hypertensive Retinopathy 54.70%
Hyperthyroidism (Thyrotoxicosis) Including Graves Disease 32.40%
Hypoparathyroidism 36.80%
Hypothalamic And Pituitary Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 43.40%
Hypothyroidism (Myxoedema) 34.70%
Immune System – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 51.70%
Inborn Errors Of Metabolism – Other / Type Not Known 53.40%
Incontinence – Stress 15.70%
Incontinence – Urge 13.70%
Incontinence (Not Enuresis/Bed Wetting) – Other / Type Not Known 20.60%
Infections – Other 72.30%
Infections – Other / Type Not Known 46.30%
Infectious Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 59.60%
Inflammatory Arthritis – Other / Type Not Known 67.10%
Interstitial Nephritis 56.40%
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) 26.10%
Ischaemic Heart Disease – Other / Type Not Known 56.90%
Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (Still’s Disease) 69.20%
Keratitis 46.50%
Keratoconus 50.50%
Kidney – Cancer Of 88.80%
Kidney Disease – Other / Type Not Known 53.60%
Knee Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 52.50%
Kyphosis 68.50%
Labyrinthitis 34.90%
Larynx – Cancer Of 83.70%
Learning Disability – Other / Type Not Known 89.40%
Leg Ulcers (Arterial) 68.10%
Leg Ulcers (Venous) 65.80%
Leukaemia – Lymphoblastic – Acute 85.50%
Leukaemia – Lymphocytic – Chronic 67.20%
Leukaemia – Myelogenous (Myeloid) Acute 89.20%
Leukaemia – Myeloid – Chronic 71.40%
Leukaemias – Other / Type Not Known 73.40%
Ligamentous Instability Of Knee 53.00%
Liver – Cancer Of 93.30%
Liver Failure – Features Of – Other / Features Not Known 68.40%
Liver Transplantation 57.90%
Lower Limb – Injuries/Fracture/Dislocation Of 55.60%
Lower Respiratory Tract – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 59.40%
Lumbar Disc Lesion 74.90%
Lumbar Spondylosis (OA Spine) 75.70%
Lung Cancers – Other 96.00%
Lung Transplantation 82.00%
Lymphoedema 71.60%
Macular Degeneration 78.60%
Malaria 61.50%
Malformations Of The Heart – Congenital – Other / Type Not Known 50.00%
Marfan’s Syndrome 62.40%
Mastoiditis 25.90%
Melanoma 86.60%
Menieres Disease 41.90%
Meniscal Lesions 50.20%
Mesothelioma 98.90%
Metabolic Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 53.10%
Metabolic Red Cell Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 61.30%
Migraine 26.70%
Mitral Valve 49.90%
Mood Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 51.60%
Motor Neurone Disease 97.50%
Mouth/Tongue – Cancer Of 84.30%
Movement Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 74.00%
Multiple – Injuries/Fracture/Dislocation 69.20%
Multiple Sclerosis 78.90%
Munchausen Syndrome 57.10%
Muscle – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 74.40%
Muscular Dystrophy – Becker Type 82.60%
Muscular Dystrophy – Duchenne 97.00%
Muscular Dystrophy – Limb Girdle 88.40%
Muscular Dystrophy – Other / Type Not Known 84.10%
Musculoskeletal Disease – Regional / Localised – Other / Type Not Known 56.00%
Myasthenia Gravis 66.50%
Myeloma 88.20%
Myocardial Infarction 48.70%
Myopia (Short-Sighted) 57.70%
Narcolepsy 47.40%
Neck Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 52.00%
Nephrotic Syndrome 52.30%
Neuroblastoma 76.80%
Neurofibromatosis 61.10%
Neurological Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 66.20%
Neuropathies – Other / Type Not Known Including Peripheral 63.30%
Non Epileptic Attack Disorder (Pseudoseizures) 59.20%
Non Hodgkins Lymphoma 80.40%
Nystagmus 65.80%
Obesity 78.10%
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) 54.30%
Oesophageal Varices 48.10%
Oesophagus – Cancer Of 93.60%
Oesophagus Stomach And Duodenum – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 41.90%
Old Age 83.60%
Optic Atrophy 84.40%
Optic Neuritis 66.40%
Oral Allergy Syndrome 11.60%
Orbital Cellulitis 23.80%
Osgood Schlatters Disease 41.50%
Osteoarthritis Of Hip 73.80%
Osteoarthritis Of Knee 64.20%
Osteoarthritis Of Other Single Joint 56.50%
Osteochondritis 69.00%
Osteochondritis Dissecans 61.70%
Osteogenesis Imperfecta 74.10%
Osteomalacia 72.30%
Osteonecrosis 74.70%
Osteoporosis 67.60%
Osteosarcoma 85.30%
Other Metabolic And Endocrine Disorders Of Musculoskeletal System 61.80%
Otitis Externa – Chronic 30.80%
Otosclerosis 34.40%
Ovarian Cyst (Benign) 39.70%
Ovary – Cancer Of 91.10%
Ovary Uterus Cervix Vagina And Vulva – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 37.60%
Paget’s Disease 75.30%
Pain Syndromes – Chronic – Other / Type Not Known 64.80%
Pancreas – Cancer Of 96.70%
Pancreas – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 51.00%
Pancreatitis – Chronic 53.40%
Panic Disorder 46.10%
Papulosquamous And Inflammatory Rashes – Other / Type Not Known 31.90%
Paraplegia (Traumatic) 97.80%
Parathyroid Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 39.20%
Parkinson’s Disease 83.10%
Parkinson’s Syndrome / Parkinsonism 86.40%
Partial Seizures (With Status Epilepticus In Last 12 Months) 47.60%
Partial Seizures (Without Status Epilepticus In Last 12 Months) 40.20%
Patellar Dislocation – Recurrent 58.70%
Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) 46.80%
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) 41.40%
Pelvis – Injuries/Fracture/Dislocation Of 67.90%
Pemphigoid 36.60%
Pemphigus Vulgaris 39.10%
Peptic Ulcer (Gastric And Duodenal)/Gastritis 38.80%
Pericarditis 40.80%
Peripheral Nerve Injury – Other / Type Not Known 60.00%
Peripheral Venous Disease – Other / Type Not Known 59.10%
Peritonitis 71.70%
Personality Disorder 61.80%
Perthes Disease 67.20%
Phobia – Social 44.70%
Phobia – Specific 45.60%
Platelet Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 43.60%
Pleura – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 58.10%
Pleural Effusion 60.90%
Pneumoconiosis – Coalworkers 91.70%
Pneumoconiosis – Other / Type Not Known 71.30%
Pneumonia 60.30%
Pneumothorax 38.20%
Poliomyelitis And Post Polio Syndrome 86.20%
Polyarteritis Nodosa 73.70%
Polycythaemia 52.20%
Polymyalgia Rheumatica 67.20%
Polymyositis 80.90%
Porphyria 60.60%
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) 58.20%
Posterior (Choroiditis) 73.50%
Posterior Vitreous Detachment 41.50%
Presbyacusis 33.30%
Pressure Sores 79.00%
Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC) 52.80%
Primary Cancer – Site Not Known 95.10%
Primary Generalised Osteoarthritis 74.00%
Prostate – Cancer Of 75.80%
Prostatic Disease 30.10%
Protozoal Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 70.00%
Pseudogout 69.60%
Psoriasis 35.90%
Psychiatric Disorders Of Childhood – Other / Type Not Known 66.70%
Psychotic Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 68.10%
Ptosis 34.30%
Pulmonary Embolus 52.90%
Pulmonary Fibrosis – Other / Type Not Known 81.80%
Pulmonary Valve Disease 64.30%
Quadrantanopia 64.00%
Raynaud’s Disease/Phenomenon 41.60%
Rectal Prolapse 35.30%
Rectum/Anus – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 33.00%
Refractive Errors – Other / Type Not Known 59.30%
Renal Calculi 43.00%
Renal Failure – Acute 68.70%
Renal Failure – Chronic 71.10%
Renal Transplantation 51.70%
Respiratory Tract – Other Cancers Of / Type Not Known 84.80%
Retina And Optic Nerve – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 76.80%
Retinal Artery Occlusion 53.50%
Retinal Detachment 63.20%
Retinal Vein Occlusion 53.20%
Retinitis Pigmentosa 87.20%
Retinopathy – Other / Type Not Known 78.10%
Retts Disorder 90.60%
Rheumatoid Arthritis 74.70%
Rickets 73.30%
Rosacea 25.60%
Rotator Cuff Disorder 42.10%
Sarcoidosis 59.10%
Sarcomas – Other / Type Not Known 87.20%
Schizoaffective Disorder 71.50%
Schizophrenia 69.70%
Schuermann’s Disease 65.90%
Scleritis 32.70%
Scoliosis 61.30%
Scotoma 53.80%
Seizures – Unclassified 54.10%
Sensorineural Hearing Loss – Other Causes Of / Type Not Known 43.90%
Sensorineural Hearing Loss Due To Trauma 48.20%
Shoulder Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 38.50%
Shoulder Instability 43.50%
Silicosis 52.40%
Sjogren’s Syndrome 56.10%
Skin Cancers – Other / Type Not Known 76.10%
Skin Disease – Other / Type Not Known 38.80%
Sleep Apnoea – Obstructive 28.80%
Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis 68.40%
Small Bowel – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 35.00%
Somatoform Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 65.70%
Specific Learning Disorder – Other / Type Not Known 67.50%
Speech Or Language Disorder 58.40%
Spina Bifida 85.40%
Spinal Cord Compression – Other Causes Of / Cause Not Known 84.60%
Spinal Stenosis 79.90%
Spine – Injuries/Fracture/Dislocation Of 75.10%
Spondylolisthesis 75.70%
Steatohepatitis – Non-Alcoholic (NASH) 50.90%
Stokes Adams Attacks (Cardiovascular Syncope) 71.90%
Stomach – Cancer Of 91.30%
Strabismus (Squint) 35.50%
Stress Reaction Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 35.70%
Sudek’s Atrophy 85.90%
Syncope – Other / Type Not Known 51.30%
Syringomyelia / Syringobulbia 80.50%
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) 62.80%
Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma) 71.80%
Tachycardia 40.80%
Temporal (Giant Cell) Arteritis (Headache) 57.80%
Tendon Lesions 40.90%
Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis) 33.10%
Tenosynovitis 46.70%
Testicle – Cancer Of 65.00%
Tetraplegia (Traumatic) 99.10%
Thalassaemia 46.20%
Thorax – Injury/Fracture/Dislocation Of 47.80%
Thyroid Diseases – Other / Type Not Known 35.60%
Torticollis 56.20%
Tourette’s Syndrome 48.60%
Tracheo-Oesophageal Fistula/Atresia 53.40%
Transient Ischaemic Attacks (Tias) 51.00%
Transplant Rejection – Renal 74.30%
Tricuspid Valve Disease 43.40%
Tuberculosis 57.30%
Tumours – Benign – Other / Type Not Known 58.90%
Tumours Of Bone – Benign 64.90%
Tumours Of The Gastrointestinal Tract – Benign 52.40%
Tunnel Vision 63.60%
Ulcerative Colitis 23.20%
Upper Limb – Injury/Fracture/Dislocation Of 45.40%
Upper Respiratory Tract – Other Diseases Of / Type Not Known 54.90%
Urinary Overflow 21.10%
Urinary Tract Infection 32.10%
Urticaria 24.10%
Uterine Prolapse 31.40%
Vasculitis – Other / Type Not Known 65.50%
Venous Insufficiency – Chronic 61.90%
Ventriculoseptal Defect (VSD) 53.40%
Viral Diseases Excluding Hepatitis And Poliomyelitis -Other / Type Not Known 61.00%
Vision – Other Diseases Affecting / Type Not Known 70.50%
Visual Field Defects – Other / Type Not Known 70.70%
Vitreous Disease – Other / Type Not Known 71.50%
Vitreous Haemorrhage 65.40%
Von Willebrand’s Disease 43.00%
Whiplash Injury 42.90%
Wilms Tumour 55.20%
Wilson’s Disease 68.30%
Wrist And Hand Disorders – Other / Type Not Known 42.10%
Writer’s Cramp 29.40%
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Success rates for PIP claims by condition

Do all people have an interview for PIP?

Will a consultation always be required if I claim PIP? A consultation will be required for the majority of people having a Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment. PIP is a ‘personal’ payment and recognises that everyone is different. Even two people with the same condition can be affected in different ways – so a key part of the benefit is making sure that the DWP can have a fuller understanding of how your disability or condition affects you.

In some situations, the Health Professional (HP) will be able to complete the assessment report using the information already provided by you and we will not need you to attend a consultation. When you make a claim for PIP, the DWP will send us the information that you have provided. Our HPs will carefully review that information and will consider if a fully justified report can be prepared.

If that is not possible at this stage we may try to gather more evidence from someone involved in your care or we may ask you to attend a consultation. We can seek evidence only from the people that you have noted on your ‘How your disability affects you’ form, so it is important that you provide a complete list and also include their full contact details.

How many PIP points for depression?

Activity 1 – Preparing food – If a lack of motivation is a symptom of your depression, you could certainly score 2 points for the need to be encouraged or prompted to even begin the task. You probably know that PIP is a points-based benefit and that under each of the 12 headings, including Preparing food, there are statements known as descriptors, and if the wording in the descriptor fits you then you score the points that go with it.

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The descriptor in this case reads “Needs prompting to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal.” Be prepared to explain what arrangements exist to get around the problem. It may be that there is someone in your household who does provide that encouragement, or perhaps this person does the preparing of vegetables and cooking for you.

Please do not make the mistake of simply stating that you don’t do it and someone else does it for you. That is not the point; what you need to get across in the claim form/appeal is why you can’t do it, on at least the majority of days, and why that help is provided.

  1. The starting point is always the wording in the descriptor so if you believe that you should score these 2 points, the Department or tribunal needs to understand why you need to be prompted.
  2. Remember also that it can be an unmet need, so that if for example, you live alone and manage by having only cold food or heating up ready meals, or perhaps heating meals that are cooked by someone else and brought to you, then the wording in the descriptor can still apply so that you can score those 2 points.

Symptoms of anxiety could also allow a claimant to score points under this heading, again it very much depends on how the individual is affected. I cannot recall a client whose need for prompting/encouragement was as a result of their anxiety but this does not mean that it can’t happen.

The descriptor that would score 4 points instead of those 2 is 1(e) “Needs supervision or assistance to either prepare or cook a simple meal.” We are talking here about someone who could both prepare and cook a simple meal (cooking on the hob and using raw ingredients) provided that they have someone with them to provide either supervision or assistance.

It is necessary to look at the meaning of those two words to make sure that the descriptor applies to you. Both words are defined in the legislation and it is these definitions that count, not necessarily what you or I might think. “Supervision” means the continuous presence of another person for the purposes of ensuring the claimant’s safety.

Assistance” means physical intervention by another person and does not include speech. A client whose husband was killed by a knife and whose resulting fear of sharp knives meant that they could not abide to use them is perhaps an extreme example of where assistance was required, in that case with the preparation of fresh vegetables.

That is at least how we saw it but the tribunal did not award the 4 points and the case is currently on its way to the Upper Tribunal. It does not seem to matter how long I do this job, clients continue to present problems that are new to me and these problems provide convincing arguments for them scoring additional points.

A claimant’s anxiety might give rise to a pronounced tremor, which might require either supervision so that the task can be carried out safely, or if it meant that either the preparation or the cooking element of the task could not be carried out and there was therefore a need for assistance from another person with that part of the task.

Upper Tribunal case law confirms that you can get to a point where the claimant is able to do so little that effectively they cannot do it at all, even with someone there to supervise or assist. The descriptor that would fit in those circumstances would be 1(f) “Cannot prepare and cook food.” This descriptor scores 8 points and it is sometimes surprising just how big a difference it makes to the overall score when either 4 points or 8 points are scored for this part of the test.

“Risk” can sometimes be an issue and the Upper Tribunal case of RJ shed welcome light onto that issue. Three Upper Tribunal judges sat together to decide RJ and this means that the case carries a lot of weight. They looked at previously decided cases, considering the meaning of “likely”, in the context of “in such a manner that it causes or is likely to cause” (harm”).

They decided that “likely” was being used in the sense of “a real possibility, a possibility that cannot sensibly be ignored having regard to the nature and gravity of the feared harm”. This is the test when considering whether there are symptoms represent a risk when carrying out any of the PIP tasks, and whether you ought to be awarded points.

  1. You may have come across phrases such as “to an acceptable standard” and “within a reasonable time period” in your research so far.
  2. These phrases come from regulation 4(2A) which says that if a task within PIP can be achieved by the claimant, you have to go on to consider whether it can be achieved safely, to an acceptable standard, as often as reasonably required and within a reasonable time period.

The judges in RJ said that the aim of regulation 4(2A) is to protect people from harm being caused by individuals undertaking daily living or mobility activities and that this aim would be frustrated if individuals were expected to carry out activities where there is a real possibility of harm but where the risk falls short of being more likely than not.

They looked specifically at Preparing food and said that “a person cannot be assessed as needing supervision to prepare food unless, with supervision, they can prepare food safely, to an acceptable standard, repeatedly and within a reasonable time period and so, amongst other things, they must be able to prepare food in a manner unlikely to cause harm to the claimant or another person in accordance with regulation 4.

This means that 1(e) for “Needs supervision or assistance” descriptor that scores 4 points is not the right choice where there is a “risk” of harm even if they are supervised. Therefore, the right choice in that situation is 1(f) “Cannot prepare and cook food”, scoring 8 points.

  1. To give you an idea, I have seen tribunals award those 8 points where the client has unpredictable seizures.
  2. In my experience, assessors and decision makers are less likely to understand the limitations imposed by depression and anxiety, less likely to believe the claimant and less likely to correctly apply the law to the facts that they do find.

My opinion is that a claimant with mental health problems is more likely to have to appeal to get the right outcome.

How far back does PIP back pay?

There are 3 stages to claiming PIP:

  1. Contact the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and fill in the PIP1 form – they can do this for you over the phone
  2. Fill in the ‘How your disability affects you’ form – you can choose to get a paper form by post or get an email with a link to an online form
  3. Go to a medical assessment

It can take up to 6 months from when you first contact the DWP to when you get your first payment. If the DWP decide you can get PIP, they’ll pay you the money you should have got from the date you started your claim. You can’t backdate PIP – this means you won’t get any money for time before you made your claim.

  • your full name, address and phone number
  • your National Insurance number
  • your bank or building society account details
  • contact details of your GP or other health professionals you deal with
  • the dates and details of any stays in hospital or residential care
  • your nationality or immigration status
  • if you’ve been abroad for more than 4 weeks at a time in the last 3 years (you’ll need the dates and details)

Personal Independence Payment claim line Telephone: 0800 917 2222 Textphone: 0800 917 7777 Relay UK – if you can’t hear or speak on the phone, you can type what you want to say: 18001 then 0800 917 2222 You can use Relay UK with an app or a textphone.

  • There’s no extra charge to use it.
  • Find out how to use Relay UK on the Relay UK website.
  • Video relay – if you use British Sign Language (BSL).
  • You can find out how to use video relay on YouTube.
  • Calling from abroad: +44 191 218 7766 Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm Calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

It should take about 20 minutes to complete the call. If you’d prefer someone else to call for you that’s fine, but you need to be with them so you can give permission for them to speak for you. The DWP will ask if you want them to send you the ‘How your disability affects you’ form by post or by email.

How much does PIP back pay?

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) is currently conducting a review of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claims made by deaf or hearing impaired people who may be affected by an Upper Tribunal decision relating to washing or bathing safely.

  • Following the tribunal ruling, from August 21, 2020, there has been a change in how the DWP considers whether someone can wash or bathe safely, as part of the PIP assessment,
  • If a deaf or hearing impaired claimant is not able to hear a standard fire alarm while washing or bathing, although the risk from a fire is low, the DWP will now consider whether a visual alarm – such as an aid or appliance – is needed, or supervision if a visual alarm would not be appropriate, in order to wash or bathe safely.

New guidance on GOV.UK confirms that the DWP is reviewing claims made on or after August 21, 2020 including those where PIP was not awarded. It is important to note that backdated payments will only affect existing claimants already receiving the Daily Living component part of a PIP award and not the mobility component.

Scotland – 2,489 claimants England – 26,420 claimants Wales – 1,894 claimants

How long is the PIP review backlog?

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has shared how it is tackling the backlog of new claims for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) and taking steps to reduce the waiting time for claimants. The average processing time for a new claim is now 16 weeks, a significant reduction from 26 weeks in August 2021.

DWP said that reducing customer journey times for PIP claimants is a “priority for the department and we are working constantly to make improvements to our service”. While an 16-week wait may provide little comfort for anyone considering making a new claim for the benefit – or those already midway through the journey – it’s worth keeping in mind that successful claims are backdated.

A successful claim for PIP is currently worth between £24.45 and £156.90 each week. As the benefit is paid every four weeks, this means people with a long-term illness, disability, mental or physical health condition could receive regular payments of between £97.80 and £627.60.

  • DWP shared its plans after Labour MP Karin Smyth asked what steps are being taken to reduce the “backlog of people waiting on a PIP claim to be assessed.
  • In a written response this week, Minister or Disabled People, Tom Pursglove, said: “We are committed to ensuring people can access financial support through Personal Independence Payment (PIP) in a timely manner.

“Reducing customer journey times for PIP claimants is a priority for the department, and we are working constantly to make improvements to our service. We always aim to make an award decision as quickly as possible, taking into account the need to review all the available evidence, including that from the claimant.” He added: “We are continuing to see an improvement in PIP clearance times, with the latest statistics showing that the average end-to-end journey has reduced each quarter from 26 weeks in August 2021, to 16 weeks at the end of October 2022.” He went on to explain the measure in place to help reduce processing times.

Using a blend of phone, video and face-to-face assessments to support customers and deliver a more efficient and user-centred service Increasing case manager and assessment provider health professional resources Prioritising new claims, while safeguarding claimants awaiting award reviews, who have returned their information as required, to ensure their payments continue until their review can be completed

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Can you track progress of PIP?

Tracking your Personal Independence Payment (PIP) appeal – If have appealed a PIP decision since 1 March 2018 (not before) and have chosen to have a face-to-face hearing you can register to use Track Your Appeal by calling 0300 123 1142, Monday to Friday, 8:30am to 5:00pm. Track your appeal can trigger an automated update to your phone or email account. Updates can include:

reminding you to send in evidence confirming your evidence has been received by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) reminding you of your appeal hearing date any responses from the DWP notifications if your appeal is postponed, adjourned or withdrawn

Further planned digital reforms include online appeal forms, evidence sharing and online decision making.

Can I check my PIP award online?

Our PIP test allows you to score yourself for the daily living and mobility components of PIP just by clicking with your mouse. It will do the maths for you, tell you what components you assess yourself as qualifying for and what rates you assess yourself as being eligible for.

  • It will even email you a copy of your test results if you decide to provide your email address – but that’s entirely up to you.
  • But you do need to be aware that a decision maker using a report from a health professional working for the Independent Assessment Services (IAS), formerly known as ATOS, or for Capita may not reach the same conclusion that you do about your eligibility for PIP.

The PIP self-test is anonymous, and the results will appear in your browser as soon as you have completed the single page of multiple choice questions. But, if you wish, you can also have your PIP results emailed to you. Start the PIP test

How many points is anxiety for PIP?

Four points You have an anxiety or panic attack. You have a breakdown or meltdown.